2021 journal article

Transformation of Long-Lived Albino Epipremnum aureum 'Golden Pothos' and Restoring Chloroplast Development

FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE, 12.

By: C. Hung*, J. Zhang*, C. Bhattacharya*, H. Li*, F. Kittur*, C. Oldham*, X. Wei*, K. Burkey n, J. Chen*, J. Xie*

author keywords: albino; Epipremnum aureum 'Golden Pothos'; Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase; long-lived; chlorophyll biosynthesis; chloroplast development; Agrobacterium-mediated transformation
TL;DR: This study reports a long-lived albino mutant derived from a popular ornamental plant Epipremnum aureum ‘Golden Pothos’ which could be used as a model for analyzing the function of genes involved in chloroplast development and generating colorful plants. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: June 10, 2021

Chloroplasts are organelles responsible for chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis, and biosynthesis of many metabolites, which are one of key targets for crop improvement. Elucidating and engineering genes involved in chloroplast development are important approaches for studying chloroplast functions as well as developing new crops. In this study, we report a long-lived albino mutant derived from a popular ornamental plant Epipremnum aureum ‘Golden Pothos’ which could be used as a model for analyzing the function of genes involved in chloroplast development and generating colorful plants. Albino mutant plants were isolated from regenerated populations of variegated ‘Golden Pothos’ whose albino phenotype was previously found to be due to impaired expression of EaZIP, encoding Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase. Using petioles of the mutant plants as explants with a traceable sGFP gene, an efficient transformation system was developed. Expressing Arabidopsis CHL27 (a homolog of EaZIP) but not EaZIP in albino plants restored green color and chloroplast development. Interestingly, in addition to the occurrence of plants with solid green color, plants with variegated leaves and pale-yellow leaves were also obtained in the regenerated populations. Nevertheless, our study shows that these long-lived albino plants along with the established efficient transformation system could be used for creating colorful ornamental plants. This system could also potentially be used for investigating physiological processes associated with chlorophyll levels and chloroplast development as well as certain biological activities, which are difficult to achieve using green plants.