2022 review

Genetic Characteristics and Metabolic Interactions between Pseudocercospora fijiensis and Banana: Progress toward Controlling Black Sigatoka

[Review of ]. PLANTS-BASEL, 11(7).

By: R. Noar n, E. Thomas n‚ÄČ & M. Daub n

author keywords: black Sigatoka; cell wall; dispensable chromosomes; Dothideomycetes; effectors; genomics; host resistance; pathogenicity; secondary metabolism
TL;DR: P. fijiensis has been identified as having high evolutionary potential, given its large genome size, ability to reproduce both sexually and asexually, and long-distance spore dispersal, and multiple control measures are needed for the sustainable control of black Sigatoka disease. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: April 25, 2022

The international importance of banana and severity of black Sigatoka disease have led to extensive investigations into the genetic characteristics and metabolic interactions between the Dothideomycete Pseudocercospora fijiensis and its banana host. P. fijiensis was shown to have a greatly expanded genome compared to other Dothideomycetes, due to the proliferation of retrotransposons. Genome analysis suggests the presence of dispensable chromosomes that may aid in fungal adaptation as well as pathogenicity. Genomic research has led to the characterization of genes and metabolic pathways involved in pathogenicity, including: secondary metabolism genes such as PKS10-2, genes for mitogen-activated protein kinases such as Fus3 and Slt2, and genes for cell wall proteins such as glucosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) and glycophospholipid surface (Gas) proteins. Studies conducted on resistance mechanisms in banana have documented the role of jasmonic acid and ethylene pathways. With the development of banana transformation protocols, strategies for engineering resistance include transgenes expressing antimicrobial peptides or hydrolytic enzymes as well as host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) targeting pathogenicity genes. Pseudocercospora fijiensis has been identified as having high evolutionary potential, given its large genome size, ability to reproduce both sexually and asexually, and long-distance spore dispersal. Thus, multiple control measures are needed for the sustainable control of black Sigatoka disease.