2022 journal article

Phytophthora capsici Populations Are Structured by Host, Geography, and Fluopicolide Sensitivity

Phytopathology®, 6.

By: C. Parada-Rojas n & L. Quesada-Ocampo n

author keywords: chemical control; disease control and pest management; oomycetes; population biology
MeSH headings : Bayes Theorem; Benzamides; Fungicides, Industrial / pharmacology; Geography; Phytophthora / genetics; Plant Breeding; Plant Diseases
TL;DR: It is discovered that North Carolina populations stratify by fluopicolide sensitivity with insensitive isolates experiencing nonrandom mating, highlighting the need for careful monitoring of local field populations, improve selection of relevant isolates for breeding efforts, and hypervigilant surveillance of resistance to different fungicides. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: June 16, 2022

Phytophthora capsici epidemics are propelled by warm temperatures and wet conditions. With temperatures and inland flooding in many locations worldwide expected to rise as a result of global climate change, understanding of population structure can help to inform management of P. capsici in the field and prevent devastating epidemics. Thus, we investigated the effect of host crop, geographical origin, fungicide sensitivity, and mating type on shaping the population structure of P. capsici in the eastern United States. Our fungicide in vitro assays identified the emergence of insensitive isolates for fluopicolide and mefenoxam. A set of 12 microsatellite markers proved informative to assign 157 P. capsici isolates to five distinct genetic clusters. Implementation of Bayesian structure, population differentiation, genetic diversity statistics, and index of association analysis, allowed us to identify population structure by host with some correspondence with genetic clusters for cucumber and squash isolates. We found weak population structure by state for geographically close isolates. In this study, we discovered that North Carolina populations stratify by fluopicolide sensitivity with insensitive isolates experiencing nonrandom mating. Our findings highlight the need for careful monitoring of local field populations, improved selection of relevant isolates for breeding efforts, and hypervigilant surveillance of resistance to different fungicides.