Herbert A. Underwood

Works (15)

Updated: April 4th, 2024 22:41

2008 journal article

Diurnal variation in the cellular and humoral immune responses of Japanese quail: Role of melatonin

GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY, 158(3), 245–249.

By: T. Siopes n & H. Underwood n

author keywords: diurnal; immune response; melatonin; birds; pineal
MeSH headings : Animals; Antibody Formation / drug effects; Antibody Formation / physiology; Circadian Rhythm / physiology; Coturnix / immunology; Coturnix / metabolism; Immunity, Cellular / drug effects; Immunity, Cellular / physiology; Male; Melatonin / metabolism; Melatonin / pharmacology; Melatonin / physiology; Pineal Gland / drug effects; Pineal Gland / metabolism
TL;DR: There exists a melatonin dependent diurnal variation in both cellular and humoral immune responses of quail that is inverse to one another during the daily light-dark cycle. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
6. Clean Water and Sanitation (OpenAlex)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2006 journal article

Time keeping by the quail's eye: Cireadian regulation of melatonin production

GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY, 145(3), 232–236.

By: C. Steele n, G. Tosini*, T. Siopes n & H. Underwood n

author keywords: circadian pacemaker; retina; Coturnix; serotonin
MeSH headings : 5-Hydroxytryptophan / pharmacology; Animals; Biological Clocks / physiology; Circadian Rhythm / physiology; Coturnix / physiology; Darkness; Eye / drug effects; Eye / metabolism; Eye / radiation effects; Light; Male; Melatonin / metabolism; Retina / drug effects; Retina / metabolism; Retina / radiation effects; Serotonin / pharmacology; Time Factors; Tissue Culture Techniques
TL;DR: The results show definitively that the eyes are the loci of a biological clock and strengthen the hypothesis that the ocular clock is a circadian pacemaker that can affect the rest of the circadian system via the cyclic synthesis and release of melatonin. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2003 journal article

Ocular clocks are tightly coupled and act as pacemakers in the circadian system of Japanese quail

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-REGULATORY INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, 284(1), R208–R218.

By: C. Steele n, B. Zivkovic n, T. Siopes* & H. Underwood*

author keywords: melatonin; body temperature; eye; circadian; Coturnix
MeSH headings : Animals; Biological Clocks / physiology; Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm / physiology; Coturnix / physiology; Eye / chemistry; Female; Male; Melatonin / analysis; Melatonin / blood; Ocular Physiological Phenomena; Photoperiod
TL;DR: The ability to maintain phase in DD and rapidly recouple after out-of-phase entrainment demonstrates that the eyes are strongly coupled pacemakers that work in synchrony to drive circadian rhythmicity in Japanese quail. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2002 journal article

Pineal melatonin secretion, but not ocular melatonin secretion, is sufficient to maintain normal immune responses in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica)

GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY, 126(3), 352–358.

By: C. Moore n, T. Siopes n, C. Steele n & H. Underwood n

author keywords: melatonin; immune response; Japanese quail; pineal; eye
MeSH headings : Animals; Antibody Formation; CD4 Lymphocyte Count; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Coturnix / immunology; Coturnix / physiology; Eye / metabolism; Female; Flow Cytometry; Immunity; Immunity, Cellular; Lymphocyte Count; Melatonin / administration & dosage; Melatonin / metabolism; Pineal Gland / metabolism; Pineal Gland / surgery
TL;DR: The data suggest that immunodepression is only observed in birds with two thirds of the plasma melatonin removed by pinealectomy, and removal of one third of the Plasma melatonin is not sufficient to reduce cellular and humoral responses in the Japanese quail. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2001 journal article

Circadian organization and the role of the pineal in birds

MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE, 53(1), 48–62.

By: H. Underwood n, C. Steele n & B. Zivkovic n

author keywords: avian; melatonin; suprachiasmatic nucleus; extraretinal photoreception; ocular pacemaker
MeSH headings : Animals; Biological Clocks / physiology; Birds / anatomy & histology; Birds / physiology; Circadian Rhythm / physiology; Female; Gonadal Steroid Hormones / physiology; Hypothalamus / physiology; Male; Ocular Physiological Phenomena; Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate / physiology; Pineal Gland / physiology; Reproduction; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus / physiology
TL;DR: All organisms exhibit significant daily rhythms in a myriad of functions from molecular levels to the level of the whole organism, showing that they are driven by an internal circadian clock. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (OpenAlex)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2001 chapter

Circadian organization in nonmammalian vertebrates

In N. T. A. E. M. Blass & F. King (Eds.), Handbook of behavioral neurobiology (pp. 111–140).

By: H. Underwood n

Ed(s): N. E. M. Blass & F. King

TL;DR: A surprising complexity in the organization of circadian systems in nonmammalian vertebrates is revealed, with at least three sites shown to exhibit autonomous circadian rhythmicity: the pineal organ, the suprachiasmatic area of the hypothalamus, and the eyes. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: NC State University Libraries
Added: August 6, 2018

2000 journal article

Circadian ovulatory rhythms in Japanese quail: Role of ocular and extraocular pacemakers

JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS, 15(2), 172–183.

By: B. Zivkovic*, H. Underwood n & T. Siopes n

author keywords: Japanese quail; circadian; ovulation; internal coincidence; retina; extraretinal photoreception
MeSH headings : Animals; Blindness / physiopathology; Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm / physiology; Coturnix / physiology; Female; Ocular Physiological Phenomena; Oviposition; Ovulation / physiology; Photoperiod; Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate / physiology; Sensory Deprivation / physiology; Vision, Ocular / physiology
TL;DR: The results do not show a role for ocular pacemakers in the control of ovulation, but they do support the hypotheses that entrainment of the central oscillators by extraretinally perceived light is sufficient to preserve a normal ovulatory pattern in LD in the absence of the ocularpacemakers. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2000 journal article

Effects of melatonin administration on the circadian activity rhythm of the lizard Anolis carolinensis

PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 71(1-2), 183–192.

By: L. Hyde* & H. Underwood n

author keywords: circadian; lizard; melatonin; Anolis carolinensis
MeSH headings : Animals; Antioxidants / administration & dosage; Antioxidants / pharmacology; Circadian Rhythm / drug effects; Drug Implants; Lizards / physiology; Male; Melatonin / administration & dosage; Melatonin / pharmacology; Photoperiod; Pineal Gland / physiology
TL;DR: It was concluded that melatonin can affect both the expression of the activity rhythm as well as the circadian oscillator driving the activity rhythms of the green anole. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

1999 journal article

Dopamine mediates circadian rhythms of rod-cone dominance in the Japanese quail retina

Journal of Neuroscience, 19(10), 4132–4141.

By: M. Manglapus*, P. Iuvone*, H. Underwood n, M. Pierce* & R. Barlow*

MeSH headings : Adaptation, Ocular; Animals; Circadian Rhythm / physiology; Coturnix / physiology; Dihydroxyphenylalanine / metabolism; Electroretinography; Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate / physiology
TL;DR: It is suggested that dopamine, under the control of a circadian oscillator, has a key role in modulating sensitivity and rod–cone dominance in the Japanese quail retina. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: NC State University Libraries
Added: August 6, 2018

1999 journal article

Effects of fasting on the circadian body temperature rhythm of Japanese quail

PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 66(1), 137–143.

By: H. Underwood n, C. Steele n & B. Zivkovic n

author keywords: circadian; temperature rhythm; fasting; activity rhythm; quail
MeSH headings : Animals; Blindness / physiopathology; Body Temperature / physiology; Circadian Rhythm / physiology; Coturnix / physiology; Fasting / physiology; Female; Photoreceptor Cells / physiology
TL;DR: Measurements of activity levels before and during fasting indicate that fasting-induced hypothermia cannot be explained simply as a consequence of decreases in activity levels, and food deprivation was also observed to cause significant phase shifts in the endogenous rhythm of body temperature. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

1999 journal article

Formal properties of the circadian and photoperiodic systems of Japanese quail: Phase response curve and effects of T-cycles

JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS, 14(5), 378–390.

By: B. Zivkovic*, H. Underwood*, C. Steele n & K. Edmonds n

author keywords: Japanese quail; circadian rhythms; photoperiodism; reproduction; phase response curve; T-cycles
MeSH headings : Animals; Body Temperature / physiology; Circadian Rhythm / physiology; Coturnix / physiology; Female; Motor Activity / physiology; Oviposition / physiology; Ovulation / physiology; Photoperiod; Time Factors
TL;DR: Studies of the circadian and photoperiodic system of Japanese quail showed that the circadian system acts like a low-amplitude oscillator: It is readily reset by light without significant transients, has a Type 0 phase response curve (PRC), and has a large range of entrainment. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

1997 chapter

Daily and seasonal rhythms

In Comparative Physiology (v. 2, ch. 24). Handbook of physiology, Section 13 (pp. 1653–1763). New York: Published for the American Physiological Society by Oxford University Press.

By: H. Underwood, G. Wassmer & T. Page

Source: NC State University Libraries
Added: August 6, 2018

1997 journal article

Eye and gonad: Role in the dual-oscillator circadian system of female Japanese quail

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-REGULATORY INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY, 272(1), R172–R182.

By: H. Underwood n, T. Siopes n & K. Edmonds n

author keywords: thermoregulation; oviposition; suprachiasmatic nuclei; internal coincidence; circadian pacemaker
MeSH headings : Animals; Body Temperature / physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Coturnix / physiology; Female; Ocular Physiological Phenomena; Ovariectomy; Ovary / physiology; Oviposition / physiology; Photoperiod; Sensory Deprivation
TL;DR: The two free-running oscillators in eye-patched birds showed evidence of mutual interaction, and significantly, the phase relationships that occur as the two oscillators interact can determine whether or not ovulation occurs. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

1985 journal article

MELATONIN RHYTHMS IN QUAIL - REGULATION BY PHOTOPERIOD AND CIRCADIAN PACEMAKERS

JOURNAL OF PINEAL RESEARCH, 2(2), 133–143.

By: H. Underwood n & T. Siopes n

MeSH headings : Animals; Brain / physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Coturnix / metabolism; Eye / analysis; Female; Light; Male; Melatonin / analysis; Melatonin / blood; Optic Nerve / physiology; Periodicity; Pineal Gland / analysis; Quail / metabolism; Xenopus
TL;DR: The blood melatonin rhythm precisely reflected the rhythms shown by the pineal and eyes, supporting the idea that the blood rhythm is a result of melatonin secretion by both the eyes and pineal. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

1985 journal article

PHOTOPERIODIC TIME MEASUREMENT IN THE MALE DEER MOUSE, PEROMYSCUS-MANICULATUS

BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION, 32(4), 947–956.

By: H. Underwood n, J. Whitsett n & T. Obrien n

MeSH headings : Activity Cycles / radiation effects; Animals; Circadian Rhythm / radiation effects; Light; Male; Organ Size / radiation effects; Periodicity; Peromyscus / growth & development; Seminal Vesicles / growth & development; Testis / growth & development; Weaning
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that light falling during the animal's subjective night, from activity onset to at least 11.8 h after activity onset, stimulates growth and maturation of the reproductive system, whereas light fell during the rest of the circadian cycle is nonstimulatory. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

Citation Index includes data from a number of different sources. If you have questions about the sources of data in the Citation Index or need a set of data which is free to re-distribute, please contact us.

Certain data included herein are derived from the Web of Science© and InCites© (2024) of Clarivate Analytics. All rights reserved. You may not copy or re-distribute this material in whole or in part without the prior written consent of Clarivate Analytics.