Joseph Milone

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Works (6)

Updated: July 5th, 2023 14:46

2022 journal article

Drone honey bees are disproportionately sensitive to abiotic stressors despite expressing high levels of stress response proteins

COMMUNICATIONS BIOLOGY, 5(1).

By: A. McAfee n, B. Metz n, J. Milone n, L. Foster* & D. Tarpy n

MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / drug effects; Bees / physiology; Cold Temperature; Female; Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects; Male; Neonicotinoids / toxicity; Nitro Compounds / toxicity; Pesticides / toxicity; Sex Factors; Stress, Physiological
TL;DR: Surprisingly, although drones are more likely to die from some stressors than workers, they exhibit higher baseline stress response proteins, suggesting that drones’ stress tolerance systems are fundamentally rewired relative to workers, and susceptibility to stress depends on more than simply gene dose or allelic diversity. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID
Added: March 21, 2022

2021 journal article

Colony-level pesticide exposure affects honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) royal jelly production and nutritional composition

CHEMOSPHERE, 263.

By: J. Milone n, P. Chakrabarti*, R. Sagili* & D. Tarpy n

author keywords: Queen developmental nutrition; Pesticides; Royal jelly; Proteins; Phytosterols; Metabolites
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Fatty Acids; Larva; Pesticides; Pollen
TL;DR: Pesticide treatment had a greater impact on royal jelly nutritional composition than the weight of royal jelly provisioned per queen cell, highlighting the indirect effects of pesticide exposure on queen developmental nutrition and allude to social consequences of nurse bee glandular degeneration. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID
Added: January 19, 2021

2021 journal article

Honey bee queen health is unaffected by contact exposure to pesticides commonly found in beeswax

SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 11(1).

By: A. McAfee n, J. Milone n, B. Metz n, E. McDermott n, L. Foster* & D. Tarpy n

MeSH headings : Animals; Beekeeping; Bees / drug effects; Bees / physiology; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Environmental Exposure / adverse effects; Environmental Exposure / analysis; Fat Body / drug effects; Fat Body / metabolism; Female; Insect Proteins / drug effects; Insect Proteins / metabolism; Male; Oviposition / drug effects; Pesticide Residues / analysis; Pesticide Residues / toxicity; Pesticides / analysis; Pesticides / toxicity; Proteomics; Reproduction / drug effects; Sperm Count; Waxes / chemistry; Waxes / toxicity
TL;DR: It is suggested that previously reported associations between high levels of pesticide residues in wax and queen failure are most likely driven by indirect effects of worker exposure (either through wax or other hive products) on queen care or queen perception. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID
Added: August 16, 2021

2020 journal article

Candidate stress biomarkers for queen failure diagnostics

BMC GENOMICS, 21(1).

By: A. McAfee n, J. Milone n, A. Chapman*, L. Foster*, J. Pettis* & D. Tarpy n

author keywords: Honey bees; Queens; Sperm viability; Biomarkers; Proteomics; Stressors; Spermatheca
MeSH headings : Bees; Biomarkers; Pesticides
TL;DR: It was found that heat-shocking queens for upwards of 1 h at 40 °C was necessary to induce significant changes in the two strongest candidate heat-shock markers, and that relative humidity significantly influenced the degree of activation. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID
Added: September 21, 2020

2020 journal article

Differences in larval pesticide tolerance and esterase activity across honey bee (Apis mellifera) stocks

ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 206.

By: J. Milone n, F. Rinkevich*, A. McAfee n, L. Foster* & D. Tarpy n

author keywords: Developmental exposure; Pesticide tolerance; Honey bee; Breeding; Esterases
MeSH headings : Adaptation, Physiological / drug effects; Animals; Bees / drug effects; Bees / enzymology; Environmental Monitoring / methods; Esterases / metabolism; Larva / drug effects; Larva / enzymology; North America; Pesticides / toxicity; Pollination
TL;DR: It is suggested that selective breeding may inadvertently increase honey bees' sensitivity to pesticides, whereas unselected, putatively feral and Old World stocks have larvae that are more tolerant. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID
Added: November 16, 2020

2020 journal article

Vulnerability of honey bee queens to heat-induced loss of fertility

NATURE SUSTAINABILITY, 3(5), 367–376.

By: A. McAfee n, A. Chapman*, H. Higo*, R. Underwood*, J. Milone n, L. Foster*, M. Guarna*, D. Tarpy n, J. Pettis*

TL;DR: It is found that queens have two potential routes of temperature-stress exposure: within colonies and during routine shipping, and data suggest that temperatures of 15–38 °C are safe for queens at a tolerance threshold of 11.5%, which is the viability difference associated with queen failure in the field. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID
Added: April 14, 2020

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