Kevin Garcia

Symbiosis, Mycorrhizae, Transport, Nutrient Exchanges, Fungal Genetics

My laboratory focuses on deciphering the molecular basis of bi-directional nutrient fluxes between plant roots and soil microbes, with a particular emphasis on arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal associations. Mycorrhizal fungi considerably improve nutrition of the host plant. Therefore, it is conceivable that utilizing these natural symbioses will reduce the amount of fertilizers in future agricultural and forestry practices. We explore the molecular players participating in nutrient allocation in arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal associations using physiological, biochemical, molecular, genetic, and transcriptomic approaches. Our research contributes to the harnessing of plant-microbe associations to improve nutrient use efficiency and tolerance to global environmental changes in agroecosystems.

Works (47)

Updated: April 8th, 2024 05:16

2024 journal article

<i>Pinus</i><i> taeda</i> carryover phosphorus availability on the lower Atlantic Coastal Plain

FOREST ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, 555.

By: J. Hackman n, R. Cook n, B. Strahm n, D. Carter n, A. Woodley n, K. Garcia n, T. Albaugh n, R. Rubilar n, O. Campoe n

author keywords: Phosphorus; Pinus taeda; Resin probes; Alfisol; Spodosol; Organic horizon
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
14. Life Below Water (OpenAlex)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: February 2, 2024

2024 journal article

The ectomycorrhizal fungus <i>Paxillus ammoniavirescens</i> influences the effects of salinity on loblolly pine in response to potassium availability

ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 26(3).

By: B. Rose n, M. Dellinger n, C. Larmour n, M. Polishook n, M. Higuita-Aguirre n, S. Dutta n, R. Cook n, S. Zimmermann*, K. Garcia n

TL;DR: This study reveals that P. ammoniavirescens can reduce Na+ accumulation of salt-exposed loblolly pine, but this effect depends on external K+ availability, which is strongly dependent on external K+ availability. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
14. Life Below Water (OpenAlex)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: March 8, 2024

2024 article

Using microdialysis to assess soil diffusive P and translocated sap flow P concentrations in Southern <i>Pinus taeda</i> plantations

Hackman, J., Cook, R., Strahm, B., Carter, D., Woodley, A., & Garcia, K. (2024, January 5). PLANT AND SOIL, Vol. 1.

By: J. Hackman n, R. Cook n, B. Strahm n, D. Carter n, A. Woodley n & K. Garcia n

author keywords: Microdialysis; Translocated phosphorus; Diffusive phosphorus; Pinus taeda; Phosphorus fertilization
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: January 29, 2024

2023 journal article

Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Nigrospora sp. isolated from switchgrass leaves and antagonistic toward plant pathogens

JOURNAL OF MICROBIOLOGICAL METHODS, 215.

By: S. Dutta n, G. Houdinet n, G. NandaKafle n, A. Kafle n, C. Hawkes n & K. Garcia n

author keywords: Agrobacterium tumefaciens; Bipolaris maydis; Endophytic fungi; Fungal transformation; Nigrospora sp.; Parastagonospora nodorum
Sources: Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries, ORCID
Added: December 18, 2023

2023 journal article

Development of split-root assays for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings to study ectomycorrhizal symbioses

METHODSX, 10.

By: B. Rose n, H. Frank n & K. Garcia n

author keywords: Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; Hebeloma cylindrosporum; Hydroponics; Loblolly pine; Paxillus ammoniavirescens; Split-root
TL;DR: A protocol to produce split-roots in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in eight weeks is described and validated by determining split-root biomass and inoculating the seedlings with the ectomycorrhizal fungi Paxillus ammoniavirescens or Hebeloma cylindrosporum. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: February 6, 2023

2023 article

Importance of root symbiomes for plant nutrition: new insights, perspectives and future challenges, volume II

Das, D., Kafle, A., Ho-Plagaro, T., Zimmermann, S. D., Bucking, H., & Garcia, K. (2023, October 4). FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE, Vol. 14.

By: D. Das*, A. Kafle n, T. Ho-Plagaro*, S. Zimmermann*, H. Bucking* & K. Garcia n

author keywords: arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB); plant nutrition; nitrogen-fixing rhizobia
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries, ORCID
Added: October 30, 2023

2023 journal article

Overexpression of the HcPT1.1 transporter in Hebeloma cylindrosporum alters the phosphorus accumulation of Pinus pinaster and the distribution of HcPT2 in ectomycorrhizae

FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE, 14.

By: L. Amenc*, A. Becquer*, C. Trives-Segura*, S. Zimmermann*, K. Garcia n & C. Plassard*

author keywords: agrotransformation; ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; Hebeloma cylindrosporum; immunolocalization; overexpression; phosphate transporter; phosphorus; Pinus pinaster
TL;DR: Results suggest that a tight regulation and/or a functional redundancy between the H+:Pi symporters of H. cylindrosporum might exist to ensure a sustainable P delivery to P. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries, ORCID
Added: July 24, 2023

2023 review

Secrets of the fungus-specific potassium channel TOK family

[Review of ]. TRENDS IN MICROBIOLOGY, 31(5), 511–520.

By: G. Houdinet n, C. Guerrero-Galan*, B. Rose n, K. Garcia n & S. Zimmermann*

MeSH headings : Potassium Channels / metabolism; Biological Transport; Saccharomyces cerevisiae / metabolism; Symbiosis; Plants / metabolism
TL;DR: This review aims at synthesizing the current knowledge on fungal TOK channels and discussing their potential role in yeasts and filamentous fungi. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
Sources: Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries, ORCID
Added: January 21, 2023

2023 journal article

The putative transporter MtUMAMIT14 participates in nodule formation in Medicago truncatula

SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 13(1).

By: K. Garcia n, K. Cloghessy*, D. Cooney n, B. Shelley*, S. Chakraborty*, A. Kafle n, A. Busidan*, U. Sonawala* ...

MeSH headings : Root Nodules, Plant / genetics; Root Nodules, Plant / metabolism; Medicago truncatula / genetics; Medicago truncatula / metabolism; Plant Proteins / genetics; Plant Proteins / metabolism; Nitrogen Fixation / physiology; Membrane Transport Proteins / genetics; Membrane Transport Proteins / metabolism; Nitrogen / metabolism; Symbiosis; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant
TL;DR: Comparison of mutant and wild-type M. truncatula indicates MtUMAMIT14, the expression of which is dependent on the presence of NIN, DNF1, and DNF2 , plays a role in nodule formation and nitrogen-fixation, and results connect root nodule nitrogen fixation in legumes with the UMAMIT family. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
3. Good Health and Well-being (OpenAlex)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: January 21, 2023

2022 journal article

Cesium could be used as a proxy for potassium in mycorrhizal Medicago truncatula

PLANT SIGNALING & BEHAVIOR, 17(1).

By: A. Kafle n & K. Garcia n

author keywords: Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; cesium; Medicago truncatula; potassium; Rhizophagus irregularis
MeSH headings : Medicago truncatula; Mycorrhizae; Potassium; Rubidium; Cesium; Soil; Symbiosis; Plant Roots / microbiology
TL;DR: It is concluded that Cs+ could be used as a proxy for K+ in AM symbiosis, but with serious limitations. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: October 20, 2022

2022 journal article

Mycorrhiza-mediated potassium transport in Medicago truncatula can be evaluated by using rubidium as a proxy

PLANT SCIENCE, 322.

By: A. Kafle n, D. Cooney n, G. Shah n & K. Garcia n

author keywords: Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; Medicago truncatula; Plant nutrition; Potassium; Rhizophagus irregularis; Rubidium
MeSH headings : Medicago truncatula / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Plant Roots / metabolism; Potassium / metabolism; Rubidium / metabolism; Symbiosis / physiology
TL;DR: The results indicate that Rb+ can be used as a proxy to assess the movement of K+ in AM symbiosis, and suggest the existence of a mycorrhizal uptake pathway for K+ nutrition in M. truncatula. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: August 8, 2022

2022 journal article

NPK fertilizer use in loblolly pine plantations: Who are we really feeding?

FOREST ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, 520.

By: J. Hackman n, B. Rose n, H. Frank n, R. Vilgalys*, R. Cook n & K. Garcia n

Contributors: J. Hackman n, B. Rose n, H. Frank n, R. Vilgalys*, R. Cook n & K. Garcia n

author keywords: Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; Loblolly pine; Nutrient use efficiency; Plant nutrition
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: July 6, 2022

2022 article

Physiological and transcriptomic response of Medicago truncatula to colonization by high- or low-benefit arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

Cope, K. R., Kafle, A., Yakha, J. K., Pfeffer, P. E., Strahan, G. D., Garcia, K., … Bucking, H. (2022, May 5). MYCORRHIZA, Vol. 32.

author keywords: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; Gibberellic acid; Nutrient exchange; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Strigolactone
MeSH headings : Ammonium Compounds / metabolism; Medicago truncatula / microbiology; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Plant Roots / microbiology; Symbiosis / physiology; Transcriptome
TL;DR: These findings highlight molecular mechanisms that host plants may use to regulate their association with high- and low-benefit arbuscular mycorrhizal symbionts. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: May 6, 2022

2022 journal article

Readily available resources across sites and genotypes result in greater aboveground growth and reduced fine root production in Pinus taeda

FOREST ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, 521.

By: T. Shively n, R. Cook n, C. Maier*, K. Garcia n, T. Albaugh*, O. Campoe*, Z. Leggett n

Contributors: T. Shively n, R. Cook n, C. Maier*, K. Garcia n, T. Albaugh*, O. Campoe*, Z. Leggett n

TL;DR: The results indicate that (1) standing fine root biomass may be related to environmental conditions that are not easily manipulated, which could inform modeling of carbon cycles, and (2) in these intensively managed plots, sufficient resources were available to allow for increased aboveground growth despite lower rates of fine root production, which supports the employment of these intensive silvicultural practices. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: September 23, 2022

2022 review

Split down the middle: studying arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal symbioses using split-root assays

(M. Gifford, Ed.) [Review of ]. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY, 73(5), 1288–1300.

By: A. Kafle n, H. Frank n, B. Rose n & K. Garcia n

Ed(s): M. Gifford

author keywords: Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; carbon; ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; legumes; nitrogen; nutrient transport; phosphorus; split-root; trees
MeSH headings : Mycorrhizae / physiology; Nitrogen; Plant Roots / microbiology; Plants / microbiology; Soil; Symbiosis
TL;DR: How the use of split-root assays could result in a better understanding of mycorrhizal symbioses, particularly for a broader range of essential nutrients, and for multi-partite interactions is highlighted. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: November 18, 2021

2021 article

Benefits provided by four ectomycorrhizal fungi to Pinus taeda under different external potassium availabilities

Frank, H. E. R., & Garcia, K. (2021, August 25). MYCORRHIZA, Vol. 8.

By: H. Frank n & K. Garcia n

author keywords: Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; Pinus taeda; Plant nutrition; Potassium; Rubidium; Sodium
MeSH headings : Basidiomycota; Hebeloma; Laccaria; Mycorrhizae; Pinus; Pinus taeda; Potassium; Seedlings
TL;DR: This study revealed that these four ectomycorrhizal fungi are differentially affected by external K+ and sodium variations, that they are not able to provide similar benefits to the host P. taeda in the authors' growing conditions, and that rubidium may be used with some limitations to estimate K+ transport to colonized plants. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: August 26, 2021

2021 review

Mycorrhizal Symbiosis for Better Adaptation of Trees to Abiotic Stress Caused by Climate Change in Temperate and Boreal Forests

[Review of ]. FRONTIERS IN FORESTS AND GLOBAL CHANGE, 4.

By: M. Usman*, T. Ho-Plagaro*, H. Frank n, M. Calvo-Polanco*, I. Gaillard*, K. Garcia n, S. Zimmermann*

author keywords: mycorrhizal symbioses; trees; climate change; environmental abiotic stress; high temperature; drought; salinity; flooding
TL;DR: The role mycorrhizal symbioses play in attenuating abiotic stressors imposed on trees facing climatic changes, such as high temperatures, drought, salinity, and flooding are focused on. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: ORCID, Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: October 5, 2021

2020 journal article

Editorial: Importance of Root Symbiomes for Plant Nutrition: New Insights, Perspectives and Future Challenges

Frontiers in Plant Science, 11.

By: K. Garcia n, H. Bücking* & S. Zimmermann*

author keywords: biological nitrogen fixation; mycorrhizal symbiosis; plant growth promoting rhizobacteria; plant nutrition; root microbiome
TL;DR: HAL is a multi-disciplinary open access archive for the deposit and dissemination of scientific research documents, whether they are published or not, for teaching and research institutions in France or abroad, or from public or private research centers. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Source: ORCID
Added: June 3, 2020

2020 journal article

Fungal Shaker-like channels beyond cellular K+ homeostasis: A role in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between Hebeloma cylindrosporum and Pinus pinaster

PLOS ONE.

By: K. Garcia n, C. Guerrero-Galán*, H. Frank n, M. Haider*, A. Delteil*, G. Conéjéro*, R. Lambilliotte*, C. Fizames*, H. Sentenac*, S. Zimmermann*

Ed(s): E. Kothe

MeSH headings : Fungal Proteins / biosynthesis; Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal / physiology; Hebeloma / physiology; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Pinus / microbiology; Pinus / physiology; Potassium / metabolism; Shaker Superfamily of Potassium Channels / biosynthesis; Symbiosis / physiology
TL;DR: Results support the hypothesis that the reduced expression of HcSKC modifies the pool of fungal K+ available for the plant and/or affects its symbiotic transfer to the roots. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
14. Life Below Water (OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: ORCID
Added: November 21, 2020

2020 journal article

Lipo-chitooligosaccharides as regulatory signals of fungal growth and development

NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 11(1).

By: T. Rush*, V. Puech-Pages, A. Bascaules*, P. Jargeat*, F. Maillet*, A. Haouy*, A. Maes*, C. Carriel* ...

MeSH headings : Ascomycota / growth & development; Basidiomycota / growth & development; Chitin / analogs & derivatives; Chitin / metabolism; Chitosan; Ecology; Fatty Acids / metabolism; Fungi / growth & development; Fungi / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Oligosaccharides; Rhizobium / metabolism; Signal Transduction / physiology; Spores, Fungal / growth & development; Symbiosis / physiology
TL;DR: It is shown that Lipo-chitooligosaccharides are produced also by many other, non-symbiotic fungi, and regulate fungal growth and development, and LCOs may function as signals regulating fungalgrowth and development. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID, NC State University Libraries
Added: September 7, 2020

2020 journal article

Micronutrient transport in mycorrhizal symbiosis; zinc steals the show

Fungal Biology Reviews.

author keywords: Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; Cation diffusion facilitator; Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; Fungal homeostasis; Nutrient transport; Zinc-iron permease
TL;DR: It is argued that adding micronutrients in the current models of symbiotic transport is essential to fully understand the establishment, maintenance, and functioning of mycorrhizal associations and Revising the vision on the role of micronUTrients, particularly of Zn, in these interactions will allow a better use of myCorrhIZal fungi in sustainable agriculture and forestry, and will increase management practices in waste land, as well as in agricultural and natural ecosystems. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: ORCID
Added: October 1, 2019

2020 article

Physiological and transcriptomic response of Medicago truncatula to colonization with high and low benefit arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

Cope, K. R., Kafle, A., Yakha, J. K., Pfeffer, P. E., Strahan, G. D., Garcia, K., … Bücking, H. (2020, December 12). (Vol. 12). Vol. 12.

TL;DR: Novel insights are revealed into the molecular mechanisms by which host plants reward high-but sanction low-benefit arbuscular mycorrhizal symbionts. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: December 13, 2020

2020 journal article

Role of cytosolic, tyrosine‐insensitive prephenate dehydrogenase in Medicago truncatula

Plant Direct, 4(5).

By: C. Schenck*, J. Westphal*, D. Jayaraman*, K. Garcia n, J. Wen*, K. Mysore*, J. Ané*, L. Sumner*, H. Maeda*

author keywords: legumes; prephenate dehydrogenase; the shikimate pathway; TyrA dehydrogenase; tyrosine
TL;DR: Data suggest that MtPDH1 is involved in Tyr biosynthesis when the shikimate pathway is stimulated, and possibly linked to unidentified legume-specific specialized metabolism. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: June 3, 2020

2019 article

Beneficial Plant Microbe Interactions and Their Effect on Nutrient Uptake, Yield, and Stress Resistance of Soybeans

Kafle, A., Garcia, K., Peta, V., Yakha, J., Soupir, A., & Bücking, H. (2019, February). Soybean - Biomass, Yield and Productivity.

By: A. Kafle, K. Garcia*, V. Peta, J. Yakha, A. Soupir & H. Bücking

TL;DR: This chapter summarizes the current understanding of the beneficial interactions of soybean plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, and fungal and bacterial endophytes and identifies major knowledge gaps that need to be filled to use beneficial microbes to their full potential. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: March 6, 2019

2019 journal article

Harnessing Soil Microbes to Improve Plant Phosphate Efficiency in Cropping Systems

Agronomy, 9(3), 127.

author keywords: arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; phosphate solubilizing bacteria; phosphate efficiency
TL;DR: This review highlights recent advances in the understanding and utilization of soil microbes to both solubilize inorganic phosphate from insoluble forms and allocate it directly to crop plants, and focuses on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, ectomycorrhizer fungi, and phosphate-solubilizing bacteria. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: ORCID
Added: March 9, 2019

2019 journal article

Nutrient demand and fungal access to resources control the carbon allocation to the symbiotic partners in tripartite interactions of Medicago truncatula

Plant, Cell & Environment, 6.

By: A. Kafle*, K. Garcia*, X. Wang*, P. Pfeffer*, G. Strahan* & H. Bücking*

author keywords: arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; carbon transport; Ensifer meliloti; legumes; nitrogen uptake; rhizobia; Rhizophagus irregularis; sucrose transport; sucrose uptake transporter (SUT); sugars will eventually be exported transporter (SWEET)
MeSH headings : Carbon / metabolism; Host Microbial Interactions / physiology; Medicago truncatula / metabolism; Medicago truncatula / microbiology; Medicago truncatula / physiology; Membrane Transport Proteins / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Nitrogen / metabolism; Nitrogenase / metabolism; Phosphorus / metabolism; Plant Proteins / metabolism; Plant Roots / metabolism; Plant Roots / microbiology; Symbiosis; Transcriptome
TL;DR: In conclusion, plant nutrient demand but also fungal access to nutrients played an important role for the carbon transport to different root symbionts, and the plant allocated more carbon to rhizobia under nitrogen demand, but morecarbon to the fungal partner when nitrogen was available. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2019 journal article

Phosphorus Transport in Mycorrhiza: How Far Are We?

Trends in Plant Science, 24(9), 794–801.

By: C. Plassard*, A. Becquer* & K. Garcia n

MeSH headings : Mycorrhizae; Phosphate Transport Proteins; Phosphorus; Phylogeny; Plant Roots; Symbiosis
TL;DR: A phylogenetic survey of candidate Pi transporters of mycorrhizal fungi that might ensure Pi unload into the symbiotic interfaces is presented and the most promising hypotheses and alternative mechanisms for this process are proposed. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: ORCID
Added: July 2, 2019

2019 journal article

The Ectomycorrhizal Fungus Laccaria bicolor Produces Lipochitooligosaccharides and Uses the Common Symbiosis Pathway to Colonize Populus Roots

The Plant Cell, 31(10), 2386–2410.

By: K. Cope*, A. Bascaules*, T. Irving*, M. Venkateshwaran*, J. Maeda*, K. Garcia*, T. Rush*, C. Ma* ...

MeSH headings : Calcium / metabolism; Calcium Channels / metabolism; Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases / genetics; Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases / metabolism; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant; Laccaria / metabolism; Lipopolysaccharides / chemistry; Lipopolysaccharides / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / growth & development; Mycorrhizae / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Plant Roots / chemistry; Plant Roots / growth & development; Plant Roots / metabolism; Plant Roots / microbiology; Plants, Genetically Modified; Populus / genetics; Populus / metabolism; Signal Transduction; Symbiosis / physiology
TL;DR: It is shown that the ectomycorrhizal fungus L. bicolor produces an array of lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs) that can trigger both root hair branching in legumes and calcium spiking in the host plant Populus in a CASTOR/POLLUX-dependent manner. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Source: ORCID
Added: October 9, 2019

2018 journal article

HcPT1.2 participates in Pi acquisition in Hebeloma cylindrosporum external hyphae of ectornycorrhizas under high and low phosphate conditions

PLANT SIGNALING & BEHAVIOR, 13(10).

By: A. Becquer*, K. Garcia n & C. Plassard*

author keywords: Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; H+:Pi transporter; Immunolocalization; Inorganic phosphate; RT-qPCR; Yeast complementation
MeSH headings : Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal; Hebeloma / physiology; Hyphae / physiology; Mycorrhizae / metabolism; Phosphates / metabolism; Phosphorus / metabolism; Pinus / metabolism; Pinus / microbiology; Symbiosis / physiology
TL;DR: Results revealed that HcPT1.2 is involved in Pi acquisition by H. cylindrosporum mycelium, irrespective of the external Pi concentrations. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID, NC State University Libraries
Added: November 26, 2018

2018 journal article

HcTOK1 participates in the maintenance of K+ homeostasis in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum, which is essential for the symbiotic K+ nutrition of Pinus pinaster

Plant Signaling & Behavior, 13(6), e1480845.

By: C. Guerrero-Galán*, K. Garcia*, G. Houdinet* & S. Zimmermann*

author keywords: ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; ion homeostasis; plant nutrition; potassium transport; subcellular localization; TOK channel
MeSH headings : Fungal Proteins / genetics; Fungal Proteins / metabolism; Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal / genetics; Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal / physiology; Hebeloma / genetics; Hebeloma / physiology; Homeostasis; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Pinus / genetics; Pinus / metabolism; Pinus / microbiology; Potassium / metabolism; Symbiosis / genetics; Symbiosis / physiology
TL;DR: A role for this channel in the transport of K+ from the medium to ectomycorrhizal roots under K+ starvation is proposed and it is reported that one of them, HcTOK1, has similar features than the yeast ScTOK2. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2018 journal article

Plant potassium nutrition in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: properties and roles of the three fungal TOK potassium channels in Hebeloma cylindrosporum.

Environmental Microbiology, 4.

By: C. Guerrero-Galán*, A. Delteil*, K. Garcia*, G. Houdinet*, G. Conéjéro*, I. Gaillard*, H. Sentenac*, S. Zimmermann*

MeSH headings : Biological Transport; Hebeloma / genetics; Minerals / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / metabolism; Pinus / microbiology; Potassium / metabolism; Potassium Channels; Saccharomyces cerevisiae / metabolism; Seedlings; Symbiosis / genetics
TL;DR: The functional characterization of three putative tandem-pore outward-rectifying K+ (TOK) channels suggested that HcTOK2.2 is implicated in the symbiotic transfer of K+ from the fungus towards the plant. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2018 journal article

The Hebeloma cylindrosporum HcPT2 Pi transporter plays a key role in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis

New Phytologist, 6.

By: A. Becquer*, K. Garcia*, L. Amenc*, C. Rivard*, J. Doré*, C. Trives-Segura*, W. Szponarski*, S. Russet* ...

author keywords: ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungus; overexpression; P-32 labeling; phosphate transporter; Pinus pinaster; RNA interference; X-ray fluorescence mapping
MeSH headings : Fungal Proteins / genetics; Fungal Proteins / metabolism; Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal; Hebeloma / genetics; Hebeloma / growth & development; Hebeloma / metabolism; Membrane Transport Proteins / genetics; Membrane Transport Proteins / metabolism; Models, Biological; Mycelium / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Phosphates / metabolism; Phosphorus Radioisotopes; Pinus / microbiology; Symbiosis; Up-Regulation / genetics
TL;DR: The results reveal that HcPT2 plays an important role in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, affecting both Pi influx in the mycelium and efflux towards roots under the control of P. pinaster. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2018 article

The Role of Plant Transporters in Mycorrhizal Symbioses

MEMBRANE TRANSPORT IN PLANTS, Vol. 87, pp. 303–342.

By: C. Guerrero-Galan*, G. Houdinet*, M. Calvo-Polanco*, K. Bonaldi*, K. Garcia n & S. Zimmermann*

TL;DR: Recent advances allowing molecular insight in the impact of mycorrhizal symbiosis on the plant “transportome” are summarized and results obtained are highlighted for plant transporters involved in the absorption of mineral nutrients and water released by the fungus at the symbiotic interface. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, ORCID, NC State University Libraries
Added: January 7, 2019

2018 article

The ectomycorrhizal contribution to tree nutrition

Advances in Botanical Research.

By: A. Becquer*, C. Guerrero-Galán*, J. Eibensteiner*, G. Houdinet*, H. Bücking*, S. Zimmermann*, K. Garcia n

TL;DR: The molecular mechanisms driving the acquisition, translocation and release of water and nutrients in ectomycorrhizal systems are highlighted, particularly on the transport of macronutrients, including nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur and calcium, micronutrient, and water by the symbiotic partner. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2017 journal article

Physiological responses and gene co-expression network of mycorrhizal roots under K+ deprivation

Plant Physiology, 2(3), pp.01959.2016.

By: K. Garcia*, D. Chasman*, S. Roy* & J. Ane*

MeSH headings : Cluster Analysis; Gene Expression Profiling / methods; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant; Gene Regulatory Networks; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Medicago truncatula / genetics; Medicago truncatula / metabolism; Medicago truncatula / microbiology; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Plant Proteins / genetics; Plant Proteins / metabolism; Plant Roots / genetics; Plant Roots / metabolism; Plant Roots / microbiology; Potassium / metabolism; Symbiosis / physiology; Time Factors
TL;DR: It is confirmed that AM associations provide some tolerance to K+ deprivation to host plants, revealed that AM symbiosis modulates the expression of specific root genes to cope with this nutrient stress, and identified putative regulators participating in these tolerance mechanisms. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2017 journal article

Polymorphic responses of Medicago truncatula accessions to potassium deprivation.

Plant Signaling & Behavior, 12(4), e1307494.

By: K. Garcia* & J. Ané*

author keywords: Development; legumes; Medicago truncatula; potassium; reactive oxygen species
MeSH headings : Fabaceae / genetics; Fabaceae / metabolism; Fabaceae / microbiology; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant / genetics; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant / physiology; Medicago truncatula / genetics; Medicago truncatula / metabolism; Medicago truncatula / physiology; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Potassium / metabolism; Reactive Oxygen Species / metabolism
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2016 journal article

A proteomic atlas of the legume Medicago truncatula and its nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti

Nature Biotechnology, 34(11), 1198–1205.

By: H. Marx*, C. Minogue*, D. Jayaraman*, A. Richards*, N. Kwiecien*, A. Siahpirani*, S. Rajasekar*, J. Maeda* ...

MeSH headings : Bacterial Proteins / metabolism; Databases, Protein; Medicago truncatula / metabolism; Medicago truncatula / microbiology; Nitrogen Fixation / physiology; Plant Proteins / metabolism; Proteome / metabolism; Proteomics; Sinorhizobium meliloti / physiology; Symbiosis / physiology
TL;DR: A quantitative proteomic atlas of the model legume Medicago truncatula and its rhizobial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti is described, which includes more than 23,000 proteins, 20,000 phosphorylation sites, and 700 lysine acetylation sites, which provides insight into mechanisms regulating symbiosis. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2016 journal article

Comparative Analysis of Secretomes from Ectomycorrhizal Fungi with an Emphasis on Small-Secreted Proteins

Frontiers in Microbiology, 7.

By: K. Garcia* & J. Ané*

author keywords: ectomycorrhizal; saprotrophs; secretomics; small-secretedproteins; symbiosis; secretomes
TL;DR: Pellegrin et al. (2015) compared for the first time the predicted secretome of 49 soil-borne ECM, saprotrophic and pathogenic fungi, revealing shared and specific features between species, and providing a better understanding of the ECM lifestyle evolution. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (OpenAlex)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2016 journal article

Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation and the Challenges to Its Extension to Nonlegumes

Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 82(13), 3698–3710.

By: F. Mus*, M. Crook*, K. Garcia*, A. Costas*, B. Geddes*, E. Kouri*, P. Paramasivan*, M. Ryu* ...

Ed(s): R. Kelly

MeSH headings : Bacteria / growth & development; Bacteria / metabolism; Nitrogen Fixation; Plants / metabolism; Plants / microbiology; Symbiosis
TL;DR: This minireview highlights the fundamental advances in the understanding of biological nitrogen fixation in the context of a blueprint for expanding symbiotic nitrogen fixation to a greater diversity of crop plants through synthetic biology. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2016 journal article

Take a Trip Through the Plant and Fungal Transportome of Mycorrhiza

Trends in Plant Science, 21(11), 937–950.

MeSH headings : Biological Transport / genetics; Biological Transport / physiology; Membrane Transport Proteins / genetics; Membrane Transport Proteins / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / physiology; Plants / metabolism; Plants / microbiology; Symbiosis / genetics; Symbiosis / physiology
TL;DR: Recent progress on molecular players of membrane transport involved in nutritional exchanges between mycorrhizal plants and fungi are reviewed, from the transport proteins involved in sugar fluxes from plants towards fungi, to the uptake from the soil and exchange of nitrogen, phosphate, potassium, sulfate, and water. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2016 article

The transportome of mycorrhizal systems

Courty, P.-E., Doidy, J., Garcia, K., Wipf, D., & Zimmermann, S. D. (2016, October). Molecular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis, pp. 239–256.

TL;DR: This chapter discusses transport of sugars from plants towards mycorrhizal fungi, and uptake and exchange of main nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphate, sulfate, potassium, and water by the symbiotic partners. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2015 journal article

Molecular signals required for the establishment and maintenance of ectomycorrhizal symbioses

New Phytologist, 208(1), 79–87.

By: K. Garcia*, P. Delaux*, K. Cope* & J. Ané*

author keywords: arbuscular mycorrhiza; common symbiosis pathway; ectomycorrhiza; effectors; nitrogen (N); nutrient exchange; phosphorus (P); signaling
MeSH headings : Carbon / metabolism; Fabaceae / genetics; Fabaceae / metabolism; Fabaceae / microbiology; Forests; Fungi / genetics; Fungi / metabolism; Genes, Plant; Mycorrhizae / genetics; Mycorrhizae / metabolism; Nitrogen / metabolism; Signal Transduction; Soil / chemistry; Soil Microbiology; Symbiosis; Trees / genetics; Trees / metabolism; Trees / microbiology
TL;DR: Current knowledge on the early and late signal exchanges between woody plants and ECM fungi is summarized, and future directions for decoding the molecular basis of the underground dance between trees and their favorite fungal partners are suggested. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2014 journal article

Potassium nutrition of ectomycorrhizal Pinus pinaster : overexpression of the Hebeloma cylindrosporum Hc Trk1 transporter affects the translocation of both K + and phosphorus in the host plant

New Phytologist, 201(3), 951–960.

By: K. Garcia*, A. Delteil*, G. Conéjéro*, A. Becquer*, C. Plassard*, H. Sentenac*, S. Zimmermann*

author keywords: ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; Hebeloma cylindrosporum; in situ hybridization; overexpression; phosphate transporter HcPT1.1; plant potassium nutrition; potassium-sodium transporter HcTrk1; protein-EGFP fusion
MeSH headings : Biological Transport / drug effects; DNA, Bacterial / genetics; Fungal Proteins / metabolism; Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal / drug effects; Hebeloma / drug effects; Hebeloma / genetics; Hebeloma / metabolism; Host-Pathogen Interactions / drug effects; Hyphae / drug effects; Hyphae / metabolism; Mycorrhizae / drug effects; Mycorrhizae / genetics; Mycorrhizae / metabolism; Phenotype; Phosphorus / metabolism; Phosphorus / pharmacology; Pinus / drug effects; Pinus / metabolism; Pinus / microbiology; Potassium / metabolism; Potassium / pharmacology; RNA, Messenger / genetics; RNA, Messenger / metabolism; Seedlings / drug effects; Seedlings / metabolism; Seedlings / microbiology; Sodium / metabolism
TL;DR: The impact of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum on the potassium nutrition of Pinus pinaster and the involvement of the fungal potassium transporter HcTrk1 are investigated to augment knowledge of the link between potassium and phosphorus nutrition via the mycorrhIZal pathway. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2014 journal article

The role of mycorrhizal associations in plant potassium nutrition

Frontiers in Plant Science, 5.

By: K. Garcia* & S. Zimmermann*

author keywords: potassium; plant nutrition; arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis; ectomycorrhizal symbiosis; transport systems
TL;DR: A model summarizing plant and fungal transport systems identified and hypothetically involved in K+ transport is proposed and some data related to benefits for plants provided by the improvement of K+ nutrition thanks to mycorrhizal symbioses are presented. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2013 journal article

Biotrophic transportome in mutualistic plant–fungal interactions

Mycorrhiza, 23(8), 597–625.

By: L. Casieri*, N. Lahmidi*, J. Doidy*, C. Veneault-Fourrey*, A. Migeon*, L. Bonneau*, P. Courty*, K. Garcia* ...

author keywords: Mycorrhiza; Nutrient transport; Transporters
MeSH headings : Biomass; Fungi / growth & development; Fungi / physiology; Plant Development; Plant Physiological Phenomena; Plants / metabolism; Plants / microbiology; Symbiosis
TL;DR: The present review summary summarizes the current state of the art regarding transport systems in the two major forms of mycorrhiza, namely ecto- and arbuscular myCorrhiza. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2013 journal article

Mycorrhiza for all: an under-earth revolution

New Phytologist, 198(3), 652–655.

By: L. Martinez-Garcia*, K. Garcia*, E. Hammer* & A. Vayssières*

author keywords: agriculture; biogeography; community ecology; evolution; genomics; inoculum; mycorrhizal fungi; physiology
MeSH headings : Agriculture; Conservation of Natural Resources; Forestry; Genome, Fungal; Humans; Mycorrhizae; Soil Microbiology; Symbiosis
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

2013 journal article

Promoter-dependent expression of the fungal transporter HcPT1.1 under Pi shortage and its spatial localization in ectomycorrhiza

Fungal Genetics and Biology, 58-59, 53–61.

By: K. Garcia*, M. Haider*, A. Delteil*, C. Corratgé-Faillie*, G. Conéjero*, M. Tatry*, A. Becquer*, L. Amenc* ...

author keywords: Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbiosis; Hebeloma cylindrosporum phosphate transporter HcPT1.1; Agrotransformation; GFP-promoter expression; In situ hybridization; Protein immunolocalization
TL;DR: In ectomycorrhiza, expression of the phosphate transporter was clearly enhanced by Pi-shortage indicating its role in Pi nutrition in the symbiotic association, and in symbiotic conditions, presence of transcripts and proteins was analyzed by the in situ hybridization technique and by immunostaining of proteins. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: ORCID
Added: February 4, 2019

Employment

Updated: September 24th, 2018 14:36

2018 - present

North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, US
Assistant Professor Crop and Soil Sciences

2017 - 2018

South Dakota State University Brookings, SD, US
Postdoctoral Researcher Biology and Microbiology

2014 - 2017

University of Wisconsin Madison Madison, WI, US
Postdoctoral Researcher Bacteriology

Education

Updated: February 13th, 2017 16:09

2010 - 2013

Université de Montpellier Montpellier, Languedoc-Roussillon, FR
Ph.D. in Integrative Plant Biology B&PMP

2008 - 2010

Université de Montpellier Montpellier, Languedoc-Roussillon, FR
M.S. in Functional Biology of Plants

2005 - 2008

Université Jean Monnet Saint-Etienne Saint-Etienne, Rhône-Alpes, FR
B.S. in Biology of Organisms

Funding History

Funding history based on the linked ORCID record. Updated: February 18th, 2024 17:55

grant April 1, 2023 - March 31, 2025
Evaluating the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on potassium acquisition and drought tolerance in cotton
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
grant September 1, 2022 - August 31, 2025
Non-Invasive Imaging of Nitrogen Assimilation in the Rhizosphere via Quantum-Entangled Hyperpolarized Spin States
Office of Biological and Environmental Research
grant February 1, 2022 - January 31, 2026
Long-term Phosphorus Carryover in Loblolly Pine Plantations
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
grant September 15, 2020 - September 14, 2023
Impact of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis on the Physiological and Molecular Responses of Legumes to Potassium Deprivation
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
grant October 1, 2018 - September 30, 2023
Impact of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis on the Physiological and Molecular Responses of Legumes and Cereals to Potassium Deprivation
National Institute of Food and Agriculture

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