Works (159)

Updated: April 20th, 2024 05:01

2024 journal article

As prey and pollinators, insects increase reproduction and allow for outcrossing in the carnivorous plant <i>Dionaea muscipula

American Journal of Botany.

By: L. Hamon n, E. Youngsteadt n, R. Irwin n & C. Sorenson n

author keywords: carnivorous plants; Dionaea muscipula; Droseraceae; plant-insect interactions; pollination; pollination ecology; reproductive biology; resource limitation
TL;DR: This study reinforces the reliance of D. muscipula on adequate prey capture for flower, fruit, and seed production and a mobile pollen vector for reproduction, indicating the importance of considering insects as part of an effective conservation management plan for this species. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: February 12, 2024

2024 report

Colorado Native Pollinating Insects Health Study

Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Natural Resources.

By: S. Armstead, A. Carper, D. Davidson, M. Blanchard, J. Hopwood, R. Larcom, S. Black, C. Briles ...

Source: NC State University Libraries
Added: February 24, 2024

2023 journal article

Bee species richness through time in an urbanizing landscape of the southeastern <scp>United States

Global Change Biology, 30(1).

author keywords: extrapolation; museum collections; occupancy models; pollinators; rarefaction; urbanization; Wake County; North Carolina
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
11. Sustainable Cities and Communities (OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref, NC State University Libraries, ORCID
Added: January 7, 2024

2023 journal article

Comparative analysis of 3 pollen sterilization methods for feeding bumble bees

Journal of Economic Entomology, 116(3), 662–673.

By: J. Strange*, A. Tripodi, C. Huntzinger, J. Knoblett, E. Klinger*, J. Herndon*, H. Vuong*, Q. McFrederick* ...

Ed(s): D. Tarpy

author keywords: chalkbrood; deformed wing virus; ethylene oxide; irradiation; ozone
MeSH headings : Bees; Animals; RNA Viruses / genetics; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Pollen; Diet
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: April 4, 2023

2023 journal article

Conflicting constraints on male mating success shape reward size in pollen‐rewarding plants

American Journal of Botany, 110(6).

By: J. Heiling n, R. Irwin n & W. Morris*

author keywords: floral reward; foraging preferences; male mating success; mathematical model; pollen donation; pollen packaging; pollen presentation theory; pollinator grooming; pollinator reward preferences
TL;DR: Pollen-rewarding plants can balance conflicting constraints on pollen donation by producing intermediate-sized pollen packages, and Darwin's conjecture that selection should favor increased pollen production in pollen-reWARDing plants is examined. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: May 15, 2023

2023 journal article

Current and lagged climate affects phenology across diverse taxonomic groups

author keywords: phenology; climate change; phenological mismatch; long-term; lags; montane
MeSH headings : Animals; Ecosystem; Insecta; Climate Change; Seasons; Temperature; Birds; Mammals
TL;DR: Comparing phenological responses of taxa at a single location, it is found that important cues often differ among taxa, suggesting that changes to climate may disrupt synchrony of timing amongTaxa. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: March 27, 2023

2023 journal article

Differential bumble bee gene expression associated with pathogen infection and pollen diet

BMC Genomics, 24(1).

By: J. Giacomini n, L. Adler*, B. Reading n & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Sunflower pollen; Bumble bee; Parasitism; Immune transcripts; Gut epithelial cells; Detoxification
MeSH headings : Bees / genetics; Animals; Pollen / genetics; Helianthus / genetics; Crithidia / genetics; Diet; Gene Expression
TL;DR: D dissimilar immune responses between sunflower- and wildflower-fed bumble bees infected with C. bombi indicate a response to physical damage to gut epithelial cells caused by sunflower pollen, and a strong detoxification response toSunflower pollen consumption. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref, ORCID, NC State University Libraries
Added: March 29, 2023

2023 journal article

Nature's chefs: Uniting the hidden diversity of food making and preparing species across the tree of life

BioScience, 73(6), 408–421.

By: B. Taylor n, B. Allf n, S. Hopkins n, R. Irwin n, M. Jewell n, O. Nevo*, L. Nichols n, N. Rodríguez Valerón* ...

author keywords: drink; food; fruit; mimic; mutualism; nectar; nuptial gift; plating
TL;DR: This article identifies three ways that species can produce or prepare meals—as food, drinks, or lures—and further distinguish between those providing an honest meal and those deceiving consumers with food mimics. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref, NC State University Libraries, ORCID
Added: May 22, 2023

2023 journal article

Sunflower plantings reduce a common gut pathogen and increase queen production in common eastern bumblebee colonies

By: R. Malfi*, Q. McFrederick*, G. Lozano*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

author keywords: agroecosystem; Bombus impatiens; Crithidia bombi; Helianthus annuus; pollinator health; sunflower
MeSH headings : Bees; Animals; Helianthus; Flowers; Pollen; Plants; Crithidia
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that a single plant species can drive disease dynamics in foraging B. impatiens, and that sunflower plantings can be used as a tool for mitigating a prevalent pathogen while also increasing reproduction of an agriculturally important bee species. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: May 9, 2023

2023 journal article

Sunflower spines and beyond: Mechanisms and breadth of pollen that reduce gut pathogen infection in the common eastern bumble bee

Functional Ecology, 37(6), 1757–1769.

By: L. Figueroa*, A. Fowler*, S. Lopez*, V. Amaral n, H. Koch*, P. Stevenson*, R. Irwin n, L. Adler*

author keywords: Ambrosia artemisiifolia; bee disease; commercial bumble bees; Eupatorium capillifolium; medicinal plants; pollinator health; Taraxacum officinale; Xanthium strumarium
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: April 24, 2023

2022 journal article

Comparative impacts of long‐term trends in snowmelt and species interactions on plant population dynamics

Journal of Ecology, 110(5), 1102–1112.

By: D. Campbell*, M. Price*, N. Waser*, R. Irwin n & A. Brody*

author keywords: biotic interaction; integral projection model; Ipomopsis; plant-climate interactions; pollen limitation; population growth; precipitation; seed predation
TL;DR: The reduction over two decades in pollen limitation suggests that natural selection on floral traits may weaken with continued climate change, and the value of studying both abiotic factors and biotic interactions to understand how climate change will influence plant populations is highlighted. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: April 25, 2022

2022 journal article

Consuming sunflower pollen reduced pathogen infection but did not alter measures of immunity in bumblebees

By: A. Fowler*, B. Sadd*, T. Bassingthwaite*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

TL;DR: It is found that sunflower pollen does not significantly affect the immune responses the authors measured, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying its medicinal effect do not involve these bee immune parameters. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 17, 2024

2022 journal article

Effects of an alternative host on the prevalence and intensity of infection of a bumble bee parasite

Parasitology, 149(4), 562–567.

By: M. Pinilla-Gallego n & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Bombus impatiens; Crithidia bombi; serial passage
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Crithidia; Host Specificity; Host-Parasite Interactions; Parasites; Prevalence
TL;DR: It is suggested that host switching has the potential to affect the adaptation of bee parasites to their hosts, and both the probability and intensity of infection on the primary host increased after serial passage through the alternative host. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: March 21, 2022

2022 article

Floral shape predicts bee-parasite transmission potential

Pinilla-Gallego, M. S., Ng, W. H., Amaral, V. E., & Irwin, R. E. (2022, June 12). ECOLOGY.

By: M. Pinilla-Gallego n, W. Ng*, V. Amaral n & R. Irwin n

author keywords: bee decline; Bombus impatiens; Crithidia bombi; floral traits; transmission dynamics
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Crithidia; Ecosystem; Flowers / anatomy & histology; Parasites; Phenotype; Pollination
TL;DR: The results highlight the importance of flower species identity and floral traits in disease transmission dynamics of bee parasites, and floral shape as an important predictor of overall transmission potential. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: June 20, 2022

2022 journal article

Life-history traits predict responses of wild bees to climate variation

author keywords: body size; nesting behaviour; temperature; montane systems; lag-effects; fourth corner
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Climate Change; Life History Traits; Phenotype; Pollination / physiology; Reproduction; Temperature
TL;DR: How climate change may reshape bee pollinator communities is shown, with bees with certain traits increasing in abundance and others declining, potentially leading to novel plant–pollinator interactions and changes in plant reproduction. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: May 16, 2022

2022 journal article

Pollen limitation of native plant reproduction in an urban landscape

American Journal of Botany, 109(12), 1969–1980.

author keywords: Campsis radicans; Gelsemium sempervirens; heterospecific pollen; Oenothera fruticosa; pollen limitation; pollen receipt; pollination; urban
MeSH headings : Animals; Humans; Bees; Gelsemium / physiology; Pollen; Pollination; Reproduction; Plant Physiological Phenomena
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
11. Sustainable Cities and Communities (OpenAlex)
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: November 14, 2022

2022 journal article

Skewness in bee and flower phenological distributions

Ecology, 104(1).

By: M. Stemkovski*, R. Dickson*, S. Griffin*, B. Inouye*, D. Inouye*, G. Pardee*, N. Underwood*, R. Irwin n

author keywords: asymmetry; bees; community; mismatch; pollination; skew; temporal overlap; wildflowers
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / physiology; Flowers; Pollination; Seasons; Animal Distribution; Plant Dispersal / physiology
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: February 6, 2023

2022 journal article

Sunflower pollen induces rapid excretion in bumble bees: Implications for host-pathogen interactions

Journal of Insect Physiology, 137, 104356.

By: J. Giacomini n, N. Moore n, L. Adler* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Host physiology; Host-pathogen interactions; Insect excretory system; Protozoan pathogens; Rapid excretion
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Crithidia / physiology; Diet; Helianthus; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Pollen
TL;DR: It is shown that a sunflower pollen diet can affect host physiology gut function, causing more rapid and greater excretion, which provides important insight into a mechanism that could underlie the medicinal effect ofSunflower pollen for bumble bees. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: May 2, 2022

2022 journal article

Sunflower pollen reduces a gut pathogen in the model bee species, <i>Bombus impatiens , but has weaker effects in three wild congeners

author keywords: bee pathogen; pollinator; pollen; Bombus; sunflower; Crithidia
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Crithidia / physiology; Diet; Helianthus; Parasites; Pollen
TL;DR: Sunflower pollen could control Crithidia infections in B. impatiens and potentially close relatives, but may hinder reproduction if other resources are scarce, and be interpreted carefully as findings may not relate to all bee species. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: February 14, 2022

2022 journal article

Sunflower-Associated Reductions in Varroa Mite Infestation of Honey Bee Colonies

Journal of Economic Entomology, 116(1), 68–77.

By: E. Palmer-Young, R. Malfi*, Y. Zhou*, B. Joyce*, H. Whitehead*, J. Van Wyk*, K. Baylis*, K. Grubbs ...

Ed(s): R. Johnson

author keywords: Apis mellifera; Varroa destructor; colony collapse disorder; landscape ecology; land use change
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Varroidae / physiology; Helianthus; Mite Infestations / prevention & control; Mite Infestations / veterinary; Mite Infestations / parasitology; Honey; Asteraceae
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: January 9, 2023

2022 journal article

What are the plant reproductive consequences of losing a nectar robber?

Journal of Pollination Ecology, 32, 97–109.

By: T. Ledbetter*, S. Richman, R. Irwin n & J. Bronstein*

TL;DR: Fly visits to flowers were dramatically higher in 2016 compared to the 1970s, and in the absence of bumble bees, muscid flies significantly reduced fruit set below the self-pollination rate, suggesting how A. caerulea may fare in a changing visitation landscape. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 17, 2024

2022 journal article

author keywords: review; tundra; ground temperatures; snow experiments; ITEX
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: June 6, 2022

2021 journal article

Floral traits affecting the transmission of beneficial and pathogenic pollinator-associated microbes

Current Opinion in Insect Science, 44, 1–7.

MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / microbiology; Behavior, Animal; Disease Transmission, Infectious; Flowers / microbiology; Host Microbial Interactions; Pollination
TL;DR: There is a near-absence of experimental manipulations of floral traits to determine causal effects on transmission, and a need to understand how floral, microbe and host traits interact to mediate transmission. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: July 26, 2021

2021 journal article

Nectar addition changes pollinator behavior but not plant reproduction in pollen‐rewarding <i>Lupinus argenteus

American Journal of Botany, 108(3), 402–410.

By: J. Heiling n, J. Bronstein* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Bombus; floral reward strategy; foraging; nectar addition; novel phenotype; pollen limitation; pollinator reward; single&#8208; visit deposition
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Female; Flowers; Humans; Lupinus; Male; Plant Nectar; Pollen; Pollination; Reproduction; Reward
TL;DR: The results suggest that a pollen-only reward strategy may allow plants that are visited by pollen foragers to minimize some costs of reproduction by eliminating investment in other rewards, such as nectar, without compromising female plant fitness. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: March 15, 2021

2021 journal article

Plant removal across an elevational gradient marginally reduces rates, substantially reduces variation in mineralization

Ecology, 103(1).

author keywords: biodiversity loss; carbon mineralization; elevational gradient; nitrogen mineralization; plant removal; plant-soil linkages
MeSH headings : Biomass; Ecosystem; Nitrogen; Plants; Soil; Soil Microbiology
TL;DR: The results present a surprisingly simple and consistent pattern of belowground response to the loss of dominant plant species across an elevational gradient with different climatic and edaphic properties, suggesting a common response ofBelowground ecosystem function to plant species loss regardless of which plant species are lost or the broader climatic context. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: December 6, 2021

2021 journal article

Seasonal Variation in Host Plant Chemistry Drives Sequestration in a Specialist Caterpillar

Journal of Chemical Ecology, 48(1), 79–88.

By: A. Carper*, L. Richardson*, R. Irwin* & M. Bowers*

TL;DR: Variation in host plant secondary metabolites may be a dominant factor driving sequestration, but other ecological factors may mitigate the relationship between host plant chemistry and herbivore sequestration. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 17, 2024

2021 journal article

The Sensory and Cognitive Ecology of Nectar Robbing

Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 9.

author keywords: cognition; foraging; nectar robbing; pollination; plant reproduction; sensory ecology
TL;DR: This review considers nectar robbing behavior either when individuals use robbing as their only foraging strategy or when they switch between robbing and legitimate foraging, and discusses sensory and cognitive biases, learning, and the role of a variable environment in making decisions about robbing vs. foraging legitimately. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: November 15, 2021

2021 journal article

The costs and benefits of sunflower pollen diet on bumble bee colony disease and health

Ecosphere, 12(7).

By: J. Giacomini n, S. Connon n, D. Marulanda n, L. Adler* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: bee health; conservation; disease ecology; parasitology; pollination biology; pollination services; tri-trophic interactions
TL;DR: Evidence is provided that sunflower pollen as part of a mixed pollen diet can reduce infection in individual bees and whole colonies with no significant nutritional trade-offs for colony worker production and most aspects of colony reproduction. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 23, 2021

2021 journal article

The influence of floral resources and microclimate on pollinator visitation in an agro-ecosystem

AGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT, 307.

By: S. Prado n, J. Collazo n, M. Marand n & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Coffea arabica; Coffea canephora; Floral diversity; Shade; Temperature; Wind
TL;DR: It was found that high nectar sugar concentration and temperature were important predictors of short floral visits to bees and the presence of other bees affected the amount of time bees spent foraging on coffee flowers and the proportion of coffee pollen carried on their bodies. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, NC State University Libraries
Added: January 11, 2021

2020 journal article

Assessing Chemical Mechanisms Underlying the Effects of Sunflower Pollen on a Gut Pathogen in Bumble Bees

Journal of Chemical Ecology, 46(8), 649–658.

By: L. Adler, A. Fowler, R. Malfi, P. Anderson, L. Coppinger, P. Deneen, S. Lopez, R. Irwin n, I. Farrell*, P. Stevenson*

author keywords: Bee pathogens; Bombus impatiens; Crithidia bombi; Helianthus annuus; Pollen chemistry; Pollinator health
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / microbiology; Crithidia / drug effects; Crithidia / physiology; Fagopyrum / chemistry; Gastrointestinal Microbiome / drug effects; Glycosides / chemistry; Helianthus / chemistry; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Plant Extracts / chemistry; Pollen / chemistry; Secondary Metabolism
TL;DR: Although sunflower pollen consistently reduced Crithidia relative to control pollen, none of the compounds tested had significant effects, and diet treatments did not affect mortality, or sucrose or pollen consumption, so the mechanisms underlying the medicinal effect of sunflower are still unknown. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: April 14, 2020

2020 journal article

Bee phenology is predicted by climatic variation and functional traits

Ecology Letters, 23(11), 1589–1598.

By: M. Stemkovski*, W. Pearse*, S. Griffin*, G. Pardee*, J. Gibbs*, T. Griswold*, J. Neff, R. Oram* ...

Ed(s): T. Coulson

author keywords: Climate change; emergence; environmental cues; GAM (generalised additive models); Hymenoptera; mismatch; peak; phenophases; senescence
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Climate Change; Colorado; Flowers; Seasons; Temperature
TL;DR: Comparison to a long-term flower study showed that bee phenology is less sensitive than flower phenology to climatic variation, indicating potential for reduced synchrony of flowers and pollinators under climate change. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: September 14, 2020

2020 journal article

Bumble bees are constant to nectar-robbing behaviour despite low switching costs

ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 170, 177–188.

author keywords: behavioural constancy; Bombus; costs; food handling; foraging; intra-individual variation (IIV); mutualism; nectar robbing; planteanimal interaction; pollination
TL;DR: It is found that bees freely foraging in meadows were highly constant to a single food-handling tactic both within and across bouts, and experiments with individual captive bees showed that these bees were willing to switch tactics and experienced minimal costs in doing so. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: January 19, 2021

2020 journal article

Colony-Level Effects of Amygdalin on Honeybees and Their Microbes

Insects, 11(11), 783.

By: J. Tauber*, C. Tozkar*, R. Schwarz*, D. Lopez*, R. Irwin n, L. Adler*, J. Evans*

TL;DR: The results suggest that amygdalin consumption may reduce several honeybee viruses without affecting other microbes or colony-level expression of immune genes, as observed by highly inconstant patterns between treatment and control and throughout the season. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: December 14, 2020

2020 journal article

Competition for nectar resources does not affect bee foraging tactic constancy

Ecological Entomology, 45(4), 904–909.

author keywords: Bombus; food handling; foraging; mutualism; nectar robbing; pollination
TL;DR: Competition alters animal foraging, including promoting the use of alternative resources, and may also impact how animals feed when they are able to handle the same food with more than one tactic. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: April 14, 2020

2020 journal article

Cross-infectivity of honey and bumble bee-associated parasites across three bee families

Parasitology, 147(12), 1290–1304.

By: L. Ngor*, E. Palmer-Young*, R. Burciaga Nevarez*, K. Russell*, L. Leger*, S. Giacomini n, M. Pinilla-Gallego n, R. Irwin n, Q. McFrederick*

author keywords: Alfalfa leafcutter bee; blue orchard bee; flagellate; Halictus ligatus; host-parasite specificity; Kinetoplastidae; Leishmaniiniae; Megachile rotundata; Osmia lignaria; sweat bee
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / parasitology; Crithidia / isolation & purification; Crithidia / pathogenicity; Honey / parasitology; Host Specificity; Host-Parasite Interactions; Microsporidiosis / veterinary; Nosema / isolation & purification; Nosema / pathogenicity; Pathology, Molecular; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods; Trypanosomatina / isolation & purification; Trypanosomatina / pathogenicity
TL;DR: Findings suggest a broad host range in these trypanosomatids, and underscore the need to quantify disease-mediated threats of managed social bees to sympatric pollinators. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: September 28, 2020

2020 journal article

Flowering plant composition shapes pathogen infection intensity and reproduction in bumble bee colonies

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 117(21), 11559–11565.

author keywords: hedgerows; pathogen transmission; pollinator decline; pollinator habitat; wildflower strips
MeSH headings : Animals; Appetitive Behavior / physiology; Bees / parasitology; Bees / physiology; Brassica napus / microbiology; Brassica napus / parasitology; Crithidia / pathogenicity; Ecosystem; Flowers / parasitology; Flowers / physiology; Larva / physiology; Pollination / physiology; Protozoan Infections, Animal / physiopathology; Protozoan Infections, Animal / transmission
TL;DR: Although high-infection flowering strips increased colony infection intensity, colony reproduction was improved with any flowering strips compared to canola alone, so flowering strips benefited colony reproduction by adding floral resources, but certain plant species also come with a risk of increased pathogen infection intensity. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: June 22, 2020

2020 journal article

Sunflower pollen reduces a gut pathogen in worker and queen but not male bumble bees

Ecological Entomology, 45(6), 1318–1326.

By: A. Fowler*, E. Stone*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

author keywords: Bombus impatiens; Crithidia; diet; pathogen resistance; pollinator; social caste
TL;DR: This work is extended to the reproductive individuals that represent colony fitness – males and queens – to assess if the medicinal effects of sunflower pollen vary with bee caste and sex. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 3, 2020

2020 journal article

Support early-career field researchers

Science, 368(6492), 724–725.

Ed(s): J. Sills

TL;DR: Policy-makers and institutions are urged to provide funding opportunities for early-career researchers to recover from disruptions, and to focus on protecting graduate students and postdocs, as the loss of a year's data can affect their ability to complete dissertations or acquire jobs. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
4. Quality Education (Web of Science)
13. Climate Action (OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: June 15, 2020

2020 chapter book

The Evolutionary Ecology of Mutualisms in Urban Landscapes

By: R. Irwin*, E. Youngsteadt*, P. Warren & J. Bronstein

TL;DR: This chapter develops a comprehensive set of predictions for adaptive evolutionary changes in morphology, physiology, and life-history traits driven by urban heat islands and evaluates these predictions with regard to the burgeoning literature on urban evolution of thermally sensitive traits. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
11. Sustainable Cities and Communities (OpenAlex)
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: October 19, 2020

2020 journal article

Towards a US national program for monitoring native bees

BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, 252.

By: S. Woodard*, S. Federman, R. James*, B. Danforth*, T. Griswold, D. Inouye*, Q. McFrederick*, L. Morandin* ...

author keywords: Pollinators; Monitoring; Native bees
TL;DR: The needs, challenges, and opportunities associated with developing a multi-layered U.S. national plan for native bee monitoring are detailed. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: January 11, 2021

2020 journal article

Within-Colony Transmission of Microsporidian and Trypanosomatid Parasites in Honey Bee and Bumble Bee Colonies

Environmental Entomology, 49(6), 1393–1401.

Ed(s): S. Perlman

author keywords: Nosema ceranae; Crithidia bombi; Apis mellifera; Bombus impatiens; disease
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Nosema; Parasites
TL;DR: Bumble bees and honey bees infected with the gut parasites Crithidia bombi and Nosema ceranae were used to understand how the initial proportion of infected individuals impacts within-colony spread and intensity of infection of the parasites. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: February 8, 2021

2019 journal article

A comparison of coffee floral traits under two different agricultural practices

Scientific Reports, 9(1).

By: S. Prado n, J. Collazo n, P. Stevenson* & R. Irwin n

MeSH headings : Agriculture / methods; Caffeine / analysis; Caffeine / metabolism; Coffea / anatomy & histology; Coffea / growth & development; Coffea / metabolism; Coffee / chemistry; Coffee / metabolism; Flowers / anatomy & histology; Flowers / growth & development; Flowers / metabolism; Light; Nitrogen / analysis; Nitrogen / metabolism; Pollen / chemistry; Pollen / metabolism
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref, NC State University Libraries
Added: June 4, 2019

2019 journal article

Bee pathogen transmission dynamics: deposition, persistence and acquisition on flowers

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 286(1903), 20190603.

By: L. Figueroa*, M. Blinder*, C. Grincavitch*, A. Jelinek*, E. Mann*, L. Merva*, L. Metz*, A. Zhao* ...

author keywords: Bombus impatiens; Crithidia bombi; pollinator health; disease spread; floral morphology
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / parasitology; Bees / physiology; Crithidia / physiology; Flowers; Host-Parasite Interactions; Lobelia; Lythrum; Monarda
TL;DR: It was found that host infection with Crithidia increased defaecation rates on flowers, and that bees deposited faeces onto bracts of Lobelia siphilitica and Lythrum salicaria more frequently than onto Monarda didyma bractS. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: June 24, 2019

2019 journal article

Chemistry of floral rewards: intra‐ and interspecific variability of nectar and pollen secondary metabolites across taxa

Ecological Monographs, 89(1).

By: E. Palmer‐Young, I. Farrell*, L. Adler, N. Milano, P. Egan*, R. Junker*, R. Irwin n, P. Stevenson*

author keywords: cultivar variation; dynamic range boxes; floral chemistry; floral rewards; intraspecific variation; n-dimensional hypervolume; phenotypic integration; plant secondary metabolites; plant-microbe interactions; plant-pollinator interactions; site variation
TL;DR: Analysis of methanol extracts of flowers, nectar, and pollen from 31 cultivated and wild plant species, including multiple sites and cultivars, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry suggests different ecological roles of nectar and pollen mediated by chemical concentration, composition, and variability (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: February 18, 2019

2019 journal article

Effect of timing and exposure of sunflower pollen on a common gut pathogen of bumble bees

ECOLOGICAL ENTOMOLOGY, 44(5), 702–710.

By: G. LoCascio*, R. Pasquale*, E. Amponsah*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

author keywords: Bombus impatiens; Crithidia bombi; Helianthus annuus; medicinal pollen; pathogen; timing effects
TL;DR: Ingestion of sunflower pollen can dramatically reduce the bumble bee gut pathogen Crithidia bombi, but little is known about how timing and exposure to sunflower pollen consumption affects pathogen load. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: September 23, 2019

2019 journal article

Parasite defense mechanisms in bees: behavior, immunity, antimicrobials, and symbionts

Emerging Topics in Life Sciences, 4(1), 59–76.

By: A. Fowler*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

Ed(s): A. Scott-Brown & H. Koch

MeSH headings : Animals; Anti-Infective Agents / metabolism; Bees / immunology; Bees / physiology; Behavior, Animal; Biodiversity; Diet; Ecosystem; Host-Parasite Interactions; Immunity; Microbiota; Parasites / microbiology; Pesticides / metabolism; Virus Diseases / immunology
TL;DR: How integrating research on host traits, microbial partners, and nutrition, as well as improving the knowledge base on wild and semi-social bees, will help inform future research, conservation efforts, and management are discussed. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: July 13, 2020

2019 journal article

Pollen and vegetative secondary chemistry of three pollen‐rewarding lupines

American Journal of Botany, 106(5), 643–655.

By: J. Heiling n, D. Cook*, S. Lee* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Bombus; defense-attraction; Fabaecae; floral reward; Lupinus; optimal defense theory; pollen chemistry; pollen foraging; pollination
MeSH headings : Alkaloids / analysis; Chromatography, Gas; Flowers / chemistry; Lupinus / chemistry; Plant Leaves / chemistry; Plant Stems / chemistry; Pollen / chemistry; Pollination
TL;DR: The results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in these pollen-rewarding Lupinus species, pollen secondary chemistry may reflect the need to attract and reward pollinators more than theneed to defend pollen from herbivory. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: May 28, 2019

2019 journal article

Pollen from multiple sunflower cultivars and species reduces a common bumblebee gut pathogen

Royal Society Open Science, 6(4), 190279.

author keywords: bumblebees; Bombus impatiens; Crithidia bombi; goldenrod; pollinator decline; sunflower
TL;DR: An important role of pollen diet for bee health and potentially broad options within the Asteraceae for pollinator plantings to manage bee disease are indicated. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: June 17, 2019

2019 journal article

Preinfection Effects of Nectar Secondary Compounds on a Bumble Bee Gut Pathogen

Environmental Entomology, 48(3), 685–690.

author keywords: bee disease; floral traits; pollinator decline; secondary metabolites
MeSH headings : Anabasine; Animals; Bees; Crithidia; Flowers; Host-Parasite Interactions; Plant Nectar
TL;DR: It is suggested that Crithidia exposure in some floral nectars may reduce cell viability, resulting in a lower risk to visiting pollinators, but this effect may not be widespread across all flowering species. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 12, 2019

2019 journal article

Secondary metabolites from nectar and pollen: a resource for ecological and evolutionary studies

Ecology, 100(4), e02621.

By: E. Palmer‐Young, I. Farrell*, L. Adler, N. Milano, P. Egan*, R. Irwin n, P. Stevenson*

author keywords: allelopathy; cultivar variation; diversity; floral chemistry; floral rewards; intraspecific variation; liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry; mutualisms; plant secondary metabolites; plant-microbe interactions; plant-pollinator interactions; site variation
TL;DR: It was found that each species possessed a distinct chemical profile; moreover, within species, few compounds were found in both nectar and pollen; and significant quantitative heterogeneity across cultivars and sites was found. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2020

2019 journal article

The individual and combined effects of snowmelt timing and frost exposure on the reproductive success of montane forbs

Journal of Ecology, 107(4), 1970–1981.

By: G. Pardee n, I. Jensen*, D. Inouye* & R. Irwin n

Ed(s): A. Satake

author keywords: climate change; frost; phenology; plant reproduction; plant-pollinator interactions; pollination services; snowmelt timing
TL;DR: While early blooming species may be at a disadvantage under climate change, species that bloom later in the season may benefit from early snowmelt, suggesting that climate change has the potential to reshape flowering communities. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: July 15, 2019

2018 journal article

Consequences of secondary nectar robbing for male components of plant reproduction

American Journal of Botany, 105(5), 943–949.

By: S. Richman*, R. Irwin n, J. Bosak* & J. Bronstein*

author keywords: cheating; dye donation; hummingbird pollination; Ipomopsis aggregata; male plant fitness; mutualism; nectar robbing
MeSH headings : Animals; Birds / physiology; Ericales / genetics; Ericales / physiology; Feeding Behavior; Flowers / physiology; Genetic Fitness / physiology; Plant Nectar / physiology; Pollination; Reproduction
TL;DR: The results indicate that hummingbird pollinators may use a combination of cues, including cues given by the presence or absence of nectar, to make foraging decisions, and suggest that secondary robbing is less costly to a component of male fitness than to female fitness in Ipomopsis. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2018 journal article

Costs and benefits of alternative food handling tactics help explain facultative exploitation of pollination mutualisms

Ecology, 99(8), 1815–1824.

author keywords: Bombus; cheating; exploitation; food handling tactics; foraging; mutualism; nectar robbing; pollination
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Flowers; Food Handling; Plant Nectar; Pollination; Symbiosis
TL;DR: Foraging theory was applied to quantify handling costs, benefits and foraging efficiencies incurred by three bumble bee species as they visited flowers legitimately or robbed nectar in cage experiments, and determine whether these efficiencies matched the food handling tactics these bee species employed in the field. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2020

2018 journal article

Crop Domestication Alters Floral Reward Chemistry With Potential Consequences for Pollinator Health

Frontiers in Plant Science, 9.

author keywords: domestication; floral rewards; Vaccinium; crop evolution; pollinator-pathogen interactions; Bombus impatiens; pollinator health; phytochemicals
TL;DR: This study provides the first assessment of plant domestication effects on floral reward chemistry and its potential repercussions for pollinator health and discusses the need to extend such investigations to pollinator-dependent crops more generally. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: October 16, 2018

2018 journal article

Disease where you dine: plant species and floral traits associated with pathogen transmission in bumble bees

Ecology, 99(11), 2535–2545.

author keywords: bee decline; bee parasites; Bombus impatiens; Crithidia; environmental reservoir; floral traits; foraging behavior; trait-based; transmission hotspots
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Crithidia; Flowers / anatomy & histology; Phenotype; Plants
TL;DR: Variation among plant species, through their influence on pathogen transmission, may shape bee disease dynamics, and surprisingly, floral size and morphology did not significantly predict transmission across species. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: November 26, 2018

2018 journal article

Effects of short‐term exposure to naturally occurring thymol concentrations on transmission of a bumble bee parasite

Ecological Entomology, 43(5), 567–577.

By: K. Rothchild*, L. Adler*, R. Irwin n, B. Sadd*, P. Stevenson* & E. Palmer‐Young*

author keywords: Floral trait manipulation; horizontal transmission; plant secondary metabolites; terpenoids; tritrophic interactions; trypanosomatids
TL;DR: Floral transmission directly exposes parasites to phytochemicals on floral surfaces and in nectar, both at flowers and, post‐ingestion, in the crop. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: October 19, 2018

2018 journal article

Medicinal value of sunflower pollen against bee pathogens

Scientific Reports, 8(1).

By: J. Giacomini n, J. Leslie*, D. Tarpy n, E. Palmer-Young*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / parasitology; Crithidia / growth & development; Helianthus; Nosema / growth & development; Pollen
TL;DR: It is discovered that sunflower pollen dramatically and consistently reduced a protozoan pathogen infection in bumble bees and also reduced a microsporidian pathogen of the European honey bee, indicating the potential for broad anti-parasitic effects. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref, NC State University Libraries
Added: October 16, 2018

2018 journal article

Phenotypic selection on floral traits in an urban landscape

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 285(1884), 20181239.

By: R. Irwin n, P. Warren* & L. Adler*

author keywords: floral display size; florivory; phenotypic selection; pollination; spatial variation
MeSH headings : Alkaloids / metabolism; Cities; Flowers / chemistry; Flowers / growth & development; Gelsemium / chemistry; Gelsemium / growth & development; Gelsemium / physiology; Herbivory; North Carolina; Phenotype; Pollination; Selection, Genetic
TL;DR: Evaluated patterns of phenotypic selection on the floral and resistance traits of Gelsemium sempervirens in urban and non-urban sites suggest that urban landscapes may not result in sweeping differences in phenotypesic selection but rather modest differences for some traits, potentially mediated by species interactions. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
11. Sustainable Cities and Communities (OpenAlex)
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: October 19, 2018

2018 journal article

Pollen limitation and reproduction of three plant species across a temperature gradient in western Greenland

Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 50(1).

By: C. Urbanowicz*, R. Virginia* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Arctic; Chamerion latifolium; pollination; pollen limitation; Vaccinium uliginosum; Salix glauca
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that both abiotic factors and pollination are important in limiting reproduction in the Arctic and that plant–pollinator interactions can mediate the response of plant reproduction to warming. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2018 journal article

Pollination Ecology and Morphology of Venus Flytrap in Sites of Varying Time Since Last Fire

Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 112(3), 141–149.

By: L. Hamon n, E. Youngsteadt n, R. Irwin n & C. Sorenson n

author keywords: Venus flytrap; Dionaea; pollination ecology; fire ecology; rare plant
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 19, 2019

2018 journal article

Publisher Correction to: The response of pollen-transport networks to landscape-scale climate variation

Polar Biology, 41(8), 1651–1651.

By: C. Urbanowicz*, R. Virginia* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: The publisher sincerely apologizes to the guest editors and the authors for the inconvenience caused after the article was published in Polar Biology, Volume 40, Issue 11, November, 2017. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2020

2018 journal article

Resurgence of specialized shade coffee cultivation: Effects on pollination services and quality of coffee production

Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 265, 567–575.

By: S. Prado n, J. Collazo n & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Coffea arabica; Coffea canephora; Fruit set; Seed predation; Bean weight; Beverage quality
TL;DR: Investigation of the ways in which fruit set, seed predation, bean weight, proportion of peaberries, and beverage quality differ between sun and specialized shade plantations of Coffeea arabica and Coffea canephora finds that specialized shade benefits the proportion of C. arabicas fruit set without compromising bean weight or theportion ofPeaberries produced. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref, NC State University Libraries
Added: October 19, 2018

2018 journal article

The ecology of insect–yeast relationships and its relevance to human industry

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 285(1875), 20172733.

By: A. Madden n, M. Epps*, T. Fukami*, R. Irwin n, J. Sheppard n, D. Sorger n, R. Dunn n

Contributors: A. Madden n, M. Epps*, T. Fukami*, R. Irwin n, J. Sheppard n, D. Sorger n, R. Dunn n

author keywords: diffuse mutualism; dispersal; Ascomycota
MeSH headings : Animals; Ascomycota / physiology; Biological Evolution; Ecosystem; Food Industry; Humans; Insecta / microbiology; Plant Nectar / metabolism; Symbiosis
TL;DR: This work proposes a ‘dispersal–encounter hypothesis' whereby yeasts are dispersed by insects between ephemeral, spatially disparate sugar resources, and insects, in turn, obtain the benefits of an honest signal from yeasts for the sugar resources. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref, ORCID, NC State University Libraries
Added: August 6, 2018

2018 journal article

Venus Flytrap Rarely Traps Its Pollinators

The American Naturalist, 191(4), 539–546.

By: E. Youngsteadt n, R. Irwin n, A. Fowler n, M. Bertone n, S. Giacomini n, M. Kunz, D. Suiter*, C. Sorenson n

author keywords: Venus flytrap; Dionaea muscipula; pollination ecology; pollinator-prey conflict; niche overlap
MeSH headings : Animals; Arachnida / physiology; Droseraceae / physiology; Insecta / physiology; Pollination
TL;DR: Analysis of the Venus flytrap finds that certain bee and beetle species appear to be the most important pollinators, on the basis of their abundance, pollen load size, and pollen fidelity, within this diverse, generalized community. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2018 journal article

Why are some plant–nectar robber interactions commensalisms?

Oikos, 127(11), 1679–1689.

By: J. Heiling n, T. Ledbetter n, S. Richman*, H. Ellison*, J. Bronstein* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: nectar robbing; commensalism; Corydalis caseana; plant reproduction
TL;DR: Three mechanistic hypotheses that can explain when interactions between plants and nectar‐robbers should be commensal rather than antagonistic are outlined: the non‐discrimination (pollinators do not avoid robbed flowers), visitor prevalence (robber visitation is rare relative to pollinator visitation), and pollen saturation (stigmas receive sufficient pollen to fertilize all ovules with one or very few pollinator visits) hypotheses. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: November 26, 2018

2017 journal article

Context-dependent medicinal effects of anabasine and infection-dependent toxicity in bumble bees

PLOS ONE, 12(8), e0183729.

By: E. Palmer-Young*, A. Hogeboom*, A. Kaye*, D. Donnelly*, J. Andicoechea*, S. Connon n, I. Weston*, K. Skyrm*, R. Irwin n, L. Adler*

Ed(s): J. Hull

MeSH headings : Anabasine / toxicity; Animals; Bees / drug effects; Bees / parasitology; Host-Parasite Interactions / drug effects; Infections / drug therapy
TL;DR: Variation in the effect of anabasine on infection suggests potential modulation of tritrophic interactions by both host genotype and environmental variables, and suggests that the medicinal effects and toxicity of an abasine may be context dependent. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2017 journal article

Direct and indirect effects of episodic frost on plant growth and reproduction in subalpine wildflowers

Global Change Biology, 24(2), 848–857.

By: G. Pardee n, D. Inouye* & R. Irwin n

TL;DR: Overall, it is found that flowering plants exhibited species‐specific direct and pollinator‐mediated indirect responses to frost, thus suggesting that frost may play an important role in affecting plant communities under climate change. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 17, 2024

2017 journal article

Facilitated exploitation of pollination mutualisms: fitness consequences for plants

Journal of Ecology, 105(1), 188–196.

By: S. Richman*, R. Irwin*, C. Nelson* & J. Bronstein*

Ed(s): I. Bartomeus

author keywords: facilitated exploitation; generalized mutualism; hummingbird pollination; Ipomopsis aggregata; multiple exploiters; nectar robbing; plant fitness; reproductive success
TL;DR: It is found that secondary nectar robbing inflicted fitness costs to plants beyond that inflicted by primary robbing alone, and the importance of incorporating multiple exploiters into the conceptual framework of mutualism is highlighted. (via Semantic Scholar)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2017 journal article

Foraging strategy predicts foraging economy in a facultative secondary nectar robber

Oikos, 126(9), 1250–1257.

By: S. Richman*, R. Irwin n & J. Bronstein*

TL;DR: Foraging strategy was a major predictor of foraging efficiency, with legitimate foraging being significantly more efficient than secondary robbing, and the need for deeper investigations into why bees adopt secondary robbing as a foraging strategy, specifically, the environmental contexts that promote the behavior. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2017 journal article

Interannual bumble bee abundance is driven by indirect climate effects on floral resource phenology

Ecology Letters, 20(12), 1507–1515.

Ed(s): A. Bourke

author keywords: Bumble bee; Bombus; climate change; floral resources; phenology; pollinator; precipitation; snowmelt; structural equation model
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Climate Change; Ecosystem; Reproduction; Species Specificity
TL;DR: This study suggests that climate-driven alterations in floral resource phenology can play a critical role in governing bee population responses to global change. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2017 journal article

Landscape predictors of pathogen prevalence and range contractions in US bumblebees

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 284(1867), 20172181.

By: S. McArt*, C. Urbanowicz*, S. McCoshum*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

author keywords: pollinator health; Bombus; fungicides; chlorothalonil; LASSO; stability selection
MeSH headings : Agriculture / methods; Animal Distribution; Animals; Bees / microbiology; Bees / physiology; Ecosystem; Machine Learning; Models, Biological; Nosema / physiology; Pesticides / adverse effects; Population Dynamics; Species Specificity; United States
TL;DR: A landscape analysis of factors predicted to cause bumblebee declines in the USA found that greater usage of the fungicide chlorothalonil was the best predictor of pathogen prevalence in four declining species of bumblebees. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2017 journal article

Nectar and Pollen Phytochemicals Stimulate Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Immunity to Viral Infection

Journal of Economic Entomology, 110(5), 1959–1972.

author keywords: immune priming; plant secondary metabolite; medicinal plant; tritrophic interaction; colony collapse disorder
MeSH headings : Animals; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides / metabolism; Bees / immunology; Bees / metabolism; Bees / virology; Immunity / drug effects; Phytochemicals / pharmacology; Phytochemicals / therapeutic use; Phytotherapy; Plant Nectar / chemistry; Pollen / chemistry; Virus Diseases / drug therapy; Virus Diseases / immunology
TL;DR: The results suggest that phytochemicals have potential therapeutic value for honey bees infected with DWV, and that flowers could serve as seasonally varied, serially consumed pollinator medicines. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2017 journal article

Synergistic effects of floral phytochemicals against a bumble bee parasite

Ecology and Evolution, 7(6), 1836–1849.

By: E. Palmer‐Young, B. Sadd*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler

author keywords: antimicrobial synergy; bumblebee; Crithidia bombi; plant secondary metabolites; pollinator-parasite interactions; trypanosome
TL;DR: Eugenol and thymol had synergistic effects against C. bombi growth across seven independent experiments, showing that the phytochemical combination can disproportionately inhibit parasites. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2017 journal article

The behavioral ecology of nectar robbing: why be tactic constant?

Current Opinion in Insect Science, 21, 14–18.

MeSH headings : Animals; Appetitive Behavior; Behavior, Animal / physiology; Flowers; Insecta / physiology; Magnoliopsida; Plant Nectar; Pollination
TL;DR: It is documented that even though individuals can switch foraging tactics, they often do not, and hypotheses of floral constancy are extended to understand when and why visitors exhibit tactic constancy and raise questions for future research. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2017 journal article

The response of pollen-transport networks to landscape-scale climate variation

Polar Biology, 40(11), 2253–2263.

By: C. Urbanowicz*, R. Virginia* & R. Irwin*

author keywords: Arctic; Climate; Connectance; Nestedness; Pollen-transport networks; Pollination
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2016 journal article

Bumble bee parasite strains vary in resistance to phytochemicals

Scientific Reports, 6(1).

MeSH headings : Anabasine / pharmacology; Animals; Bees / parasitology; Cells, Cultured; Crithidia / drug effects; Crithidia / pathogenicity; Crithidia / physiology; Eugenol / pharmacology; Host-Parasite Interactions; Phytochemicals / pharmacology; Thymol / pharmacology; Thymus Plant / chemistry
TL;DR: Exposure of C. bombi to naturally occurring levels of phytochemicals—either within bees or during parasite transmission via flowers—could influence infection in nature, suggesting that selection for phytochemical resistance could drive parasite evolution. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2016 journal article

Consequences of a nectar yeast for pollinator preference and performance

Functional Ecology, 31(3), 613–621.

By: R. Schaeffer*, Y. Mei*, J. Andicoechea*, J. Manson* & R. Irwin*

Ed(s): G. Kudo

author keywords: Bombus impatiens; Metschnikowia reukaufii; nectar yeasts; pollinator preference; pollinator reproduction
TL;DR: It is suggested that nectar yeasts can enhance floral signaling as well as alter pollinator foraging behavior at individual flowers, though they may not directly affect pollinator performance. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2016 journal article

Effects of florivory on plant-pollinator interactions: Implications for male and female components of plant reproduction

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY, 103(6), 1061–1070.

By: A. Carper*, L. Adler* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: florivory; floral herbivory; pollination; indirect effects; pollen transfer
MeSH headings : Animals; Coloring Agents / metabolism; Feeding Behavior / physiology; Flowers / physiology; Fluorescence; Gelsemium / physiology; Insecta / physiology; Pollination / physiology; Reproduction / physiology; Seeds / physiology
TL;DR: The results suggest that florivory can have positive indirect effects on estimated male plant reproduction through changes in different pollinators' behavior at flowers, but the effects of floral damage vary with male vs. female function. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2016 journal article

Food Limitation Affects Parasite Load and Survival of <i>Bombus impatiens</i> (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Infected With<i>Crithidia</i>(Trypanosomatida: Trypanosomatidae)

Environmental Entomology, 45(5), 1212–1219.

By: T. Conroy*, E. Palmer-Young*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

author keywords: Bombus impatiens; Crithidia; gut parasite; host quality; nutrition
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / parasitology; Crithidia / physiology; Food Preferences; Longevity; Parasite Load; Plant Nectar / metabolism; Pollen / metabolism
TL;DR: Nectar and pollen availability are both important for bee survival, but may come at a cost of higher parasite loads, illustrating the importance of understanding environmental context, such as resource availability, when examining a host-parasite interaction. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2016 journal article

Geographic variation in resistance to nectar robbing and consequences for pollination

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF BOTANY, 103(10), 1819–1828.

By: L. Adler*, L. Leege* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Carolina jessamine; common garden experiment; nectar robbing; Gelsemium sempervirens; geographic mosaic; Loganiaceae; pollination; resistance
MeSH headings : Animal Distribution; Animals; Biological Evolution; Flowers / physiology; Gelsemium / physiology; Georgia; Insecta / physiology; Plant Nectar / analysis; Pollination; Symbiosis
TL;DR: It is indicated that geographic variation can play a strong role structuring interactions with floral antagonists and mutualists and provides evidence consistent with the hypothesis that local resistance to nectar robbing imposes costs in terms of decreased pollinator attraction and reproduction. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2016 journal article

Nectar chemistry mediates the behavior of parasitized bees: consequences for plant fitness

Ecology, 97(2), 325–337.

By: L. Richardson*, M. Bowers* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: Nectar secondary metabolites can mediate the behavior of pollinators with subsequent benefits for estimates of plant reproduction, and are demonstrated to be important in the attraction of mutualists rather than deterrence of antagonists. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2016 journal article

Phenological change in a spring ephemeral: implications for pollination and plant reproduction

Global Change Biology, 22(5), 1779–1793.

By: Z. Gezon*, D. Inouye* & R. Irwin*

author keywords: Claytonia lanceolata; climate change; phenological mismatch; phenology; plant reproduction; pollen limitation; pollination
MeSH headings : Climate Change; Colorado; Flowers / growth & development; Flowers / physiology; Pollination; Portulacaceae / growth & development; Portulacaceae / physiology; Reproduction; Seasons
TL;DR: The results suggest that climate change may constrain the success of early‐flowering plants not through plant‐pollinator mismatch but through the direct impacts of extreme environmental conditions. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2016 journal article

Seasonal variation in the secondary chemistry of foliar and reproductive tissues of Delphinium nuttallianum

BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMATICS AND ECOLOGY, 65, 93–99.

By: D. Cook*, A. Slominski*, D. Gardner*, J. Pfister* & R. Irwin n

author keywords: Larkspur; Delphinium; Norditerpene alkaloids; Plant parts; Life history
TL;DR: It is suggested that alkaloid allocation in different plant parts of D. nuttallianum is influenced by life history of the plant, consistent with plant defense theory, and the ecological significance of this structural diversification awaits further exploration. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2016 journal article

Species-specific diagnostics of Apis mellifera trypanosomatids: A nine-year survey (2007-2015) for trypanosomatids and microsporidians in Serbian honey bees

JOURNAL OF INVERTEBRATE PATHOLOGY, 139, 6–11.

author keywords: Crithidia; Lotmaria; Molecular diagnostics; Nosema; Pathogen survey
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / parasitology; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Serbia; Species Specificity; Trypanosomatina
TL;DR: Results support the hypothesis that L. passim has predominated over C. mellificae in A. mellifera during the past decade, and species-specific primers for PCR were developed to detect this species. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science; OpenAlex)
Source: Web Of Science
Added: August 6, 2018

2015 journal article

Effects of fragmentation on a distinctive coastal sage scrub bee fauna revealed through incidental captures by pitfall traps

Journal of Insect Conservation, 19(1), 175–179.

author keywords: Anthophila; Pollinators; By-catch; Habitat fragmentation; Museum records
TL;DR: The effects of urbanization-induced habitat fragmentation on the native bee fauna inhabiting coastal sage scrub habitats of San Diego County, California, USA, a hotspot of bee biodiversity is examined. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
11. Sustainable Cities and Communities (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2020

2015 journal article

Nectar yeasts in Delphinium nuttallianum (Ranunculaceae) and their effects on nectar quality

Fungal Ecology, 18, 100–106.

author keywords: Delphinium nuttallianum; Floral nectar; Metschnikowia reukaufii; Nectar composition; Nectar yeasts; Pollination
TL;DR: It is documented that yeasts form species-poor communities in populations of this hermaphroditic perennial, in addition to highlighting their spatio-temporal dynamics and effects on nectar quality. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2020

2015 journal article

Pollination ecology and floral visitor spectrum of turtlehead (<i>Chelone glabra</i> L.; Plantaginaceae)

Journal of Pollination Ecology, 17, 132–144.

By: L. Richardson* & R. Irwin n

TL;DR: Diurnal variation in reward presentation that was a function of both floral phenology and consumer behavior was found, possibly indicating a negative effect of non-pollinating flower visitors on plant reproductive success. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2015 journal article

Possible Synergistic Effects of Thymol and Nicotine against Crithidia bombi Parasitism in Bumble Bees

PLOS ONE, 10(12), e0144668.

By: O. Biller, L. Adler, R. Irwin*, C. McAllister & E. Palmer-Young

Ed(s): C. Rodriguez-Saona

TL;DR: The results tentatively suggest the value of a mixed diet for host immunity, yet contrast with research on the antimicrobial activity of dietary thymol and nicotine in vertebrate and other invertebrate systems. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
3. Good Health and Well-being (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 17, 2024

2015 journal article

Quantifying direct vs. indirect effects of nectar robbers on male and female components of plant fitness

Journal of Ecology, 103(6), 1487–1497.

By: R. Irwin*, P. Howell* & C. Galen*

Ed(s): S. Bonser

author keywords: compensation; direct effects; floral larceny; indirect effects; Ipomopsis aggregata; nectar robbing; plant-pollinator interactions; pollen receipt; pollination; reproductive ecology
TL;DR: The results highlight the importance of indirect effects in mediating the fitness consequences of species interactions and suggest that robbing effects in general may occur through more indirect mechanisms when nectar removal by robbers is high relative to nectar replenishment, and that compensation for robbing is then more profitable through the production of additional flowers. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
13. Climate Action (Web of Science)
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2015 journal article

Secondary metabolites in floral nectar reduce parasite infections in bumblebees

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282(1803), 20142471.

By: L. Richardson*, L. Adler*, A. Leonard*, J. Andicoechea*, K. Regan*, W. Anthony*, J. Manson*, R. Irwin*

TL;DR: The novel results highlight that although secondary metabolites may not rescue survival in infected bees, they may play a vital role in mediating Crithidia transmission within and between colonies by reducingCrithidia infection intensities. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2015 journal article

Testing Dose-Dependent Effects of the Nectar Alkaloid Anabasine on Trypanosome Parasite Loads in Adult Bumble Bees

PLOS ONE, 10(11), e0142496.

By: W. Anthony*, E. Palmer-Young*, A. Leonard*, R. Irwin n & L. Adler*

Ed(s): J. Nieh

MeSH headings : Anabasine / administration & dosage; Animals; Bees / drug effects; Bees / parasitology; Crithidia / drug effects; Crithidia / pathogenicity; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Herbivory / drug effects; Host-Parasite Interactions / drug effects; Parasite Load; Plant Nectar / administration & dosage; Plant Nectar / chemistry; Plants, Medicinal / chemistry; Tobacco / chemistry
TL;DR: The results suggest that consuming anabasine at the higher levels of the natural range could reduce or clear pathogen loads without incurring costs for healthy bees. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (Web of Science)
Sources: Web Of Science, Crossref
Added: August 6, 2018

2015 journal article

The effect of repeated, lethal sampling on wild bee abundance and diversity

Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 6(9), 1044–1054.

By: Z. Gezon*, E. Wyman*, J. Ascher*, D. Inouye* & R. Irwin*

Ed(s): J. Vamosi

TL;DR: It is found that the standardized method for sampling bees, with specimens from 132 morphospecies, did not affect bee communities in terms of abundance, rarefied richness, evenness, or functional group composition, and this suggests that bee monitoring programmes sampling once every two weeks with pan traps and netting will not affect community structure. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 17, 2024

2015 journal article

Variable effects of nicotine and anabasine on parasitized bumble bees

F1000Research, 4, 880.

By: L. Thorburn, L. Adler, R. Irwin n & E. Palmer-Young

UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
3. Good Health and Well-being (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2014 journal article

Arranging the bouquet of disease: floral traits and the transmission of plant and animal pathogens

Ecology Letters, 17(5), 624–636.

Ed(s): J. Gurevitch

TL;DR: This work provides the first systematic review regarding how floral traits attract vectors, mediate disease establishment and evolve under complex interactions with plant mutualists that can be vectors for microbial antagonists. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2014 journal article

Effects of Suburbanization on Forest Bee Communities

Environmental Entomology, 43(2), 253–262.

TL;DR: It is suggested that open habitats and the availability of floral resources in suburban sites can support abundant and diverse bee communities and underscore the potential for native bee conservation in urban habitats. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
11. Sustainable Cities and Communities (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2014 journal article

Nectar Yeasts in the Tall Larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae) and Effects on Components of Pollinator Foraging Behavior

PLoS ONE, 9(10), e108214.

By: R. Schaeffer*, C. Phillips*, M. Duryea*, J. Andicoechea* & R. Irwin*

Ed(s): S. Huang

TL;DR: Variation in the occurrence and density of nectar-inhabiting yeasts have the potential to alter components of pollinator foraging behavior linked to pollen transfer and plant fitness. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2014 journal article

Plant–animal interactions in suburban environments: implications for floral evolution

Oecologia, 174(3), 803–815.

author keywords: Suburbanization; Floral evolution; Florivory; Nectar robbing; Gelsemium sempervirens
MeSH headings : Animals; Biological Evolution; Ecology; Flowers / anatomy & histology; Flowers / genetics; Gelsemium / anatomy & histology; Gelsemium / genetics; Phenotype; Plant Nectar; Pollen / physiology; Pollination; Selection, Genetic; Southeastern United States; Symbiosis; Urbanization
TL;DR: It was found that Gelsemium growing in suburban sites experienced more robbing and florivory as well as more heterospecific but not conspecific pollen transfer, andFloral traits, particularly corolla length and width, influenced the susceptibility of plants to particular interactors. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
11. Sustainable Cities and Communities (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: October 29, 2020

2014 journal article

Secondary Compounds in Floral Rewards of Toxic Rangeland Plants: Impacts on Pollinators

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 62(30), 7335–7344.

By: R. Irwin*, D. Cook*, L. Richardson*, J. Manson* & D. Gardner*

author keywords: alkaloid; nectar; pollen; pollinator; secondary metabolite
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees; Birds; Ecosystem; Flowers / chemistry; Insecta; Plant Nectar / chemistry; Plants, Toxic / chemistry; Pollen / chemistry; Pollination; Symbiosis; United States
TL;DR: The biochemical, physiological, and behavioral mechanisms by which pollinators cope with secondary compound consumption are discussed, drawing parallels between pollinators and herbivores. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: August 28, 2020

2014 journal article

Yeasts in nectar enhance male fitness in a montane perennial herb

Ecology, 95(7), 1792–1798.

By: R. Schaeffer* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: Results provide evidence of effects of nectar-inhabiting yeasts on male plant fitness and highlight the importance of microorganisms in mediating plant-pollinator interactions and subsequent plant fitness. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 17, 2024

2013 journal article

Dose‐dependent effects of nectar alkaloids in a montane plant–pollinator community

Journal of Ecology, 101(6), 1604–1612.

By: J. Manson*, D. Cook*, D. Gardner* & R. Irwin*

Ed(s): M. Heil

TL;DR: Experimental insight is provided into the dose‐dependent ecological consequences of nectar secondary metabolites for pollinators and pollination, suggesting that low nectar alkaloid concentrations incurred no ecological costs for D. barbeyi. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2013 journal article

Norditerpene alkaloid concentrations in tissues and floral rewards of larkspurs and impacts on pollinators

Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 48, 123–131.

By: D. Cook*, J. Manson*, D. Gardner*, K. Welch* & R. Irwin*

author keywords: Larkspur; Delphinium; Norditerpene alkaloids; Plant parts; Pollen; Nectar
TL;DR: It is suggested that nectar with low alkaloid concentrations may be beneficial to plant fitness by limiting adverse effects on pollinator activity and optimal defense theory. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: August 28, 2020

2013 journal article

Using economic instruments to develop effective management of invasive species: insights from a bioeconomic model

Ecological Applications, 23(5), 1086–1100.

By: S. McDermott*, R. Irwin* & B. Taylor*

Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2012 journal article

Effects of abiotic factors and species interactions on estimates of male plant function: a meta‐analysis

Ecology Letters, 16(3), 399–408.

By: R. Schaeffer*, J. Manson* & R. Irwin*

Ed(s): J. Gurevitch

TL;DR: Meta-analysis finds significant effects of abiotic factors and species interactions on estimates of male function, with responses varying depending on environmental factor identity, suggesting that some male function estimates may fail to capture the effects of environmental factors on male fitness. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2012 journal article

Nectar alkaloids decrease pollination and female reproduction in a native plant

Oecologia, 168(4), 1033–1041.

By: L. Adler* & R. Irwin*

author keywords: Floral evolution; Gelsemine; Nectar robbing; Pollination; Toxic nectar
MeSH headings : Alkaloids / analysis; Alkaloids / pharmacology; Analysis of Variance; Animals; Behavior, Animal / drug effects; Biological Evolution; Gelsemium / chemistry; Georgia; Insecta / drug effects; Plant Nectar / chemistry; Pollination / drug effects; Reproduction / drug effects; Sex Factors
TL;DR: This work suggests that nectar alkaloids are more costly than beneficial in the authors' system, and that relatively small-scale spatial variation in trait effects and interactions could determine the selective impacts of traits such as nectar composition. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: October 29, 2020

2012 chapter book

The role of trait-mediated indirect interactions for multispecies plant–animal mutualisms

By: R. Irwin*

Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2012 journal article

What you smell is more important than what you see? Natural selection on floral scent

New Phytologist, 195(3), 510–511.

By: L. Adler* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: The work presented in this issue of New Phytologist provides a significant step forward in the understanding of phenotypic selection on floral traits by showing that floral scent can be under stronger selection than more traditionally measured floral morphological traits, such as floral size and color. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2012 journal article

When resources don't rescue: flowering phenology and species interactions affect compensation to herbivory in <i>Ipomopsis aggregata

Oikos, 121(9), 1424–1434.

By: A. Brody* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: The results demonstrate that the variability in plant response to herbivory can, at least in part, be driven by plant interactions with mutualists and enemies. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2011 journal article

Additive effects of herbivory, nectar robbing and seed predation on male and female fitness estimates of the host plant Ipomopsis aggregata

Oecologia, 166(3), 681–692.

By: R. Irwin* & A. Brody*

author keywords: Herbivory; Ipomopsis aggregata; Nectar robbing; Nectar; Phenology; Pollination; Pollen deposition; Seed predation; Trait-based approach
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / physiology; Birds / physiology; Colorado; Deer / physiology; Diptera / physiology; Feeding Behavior; Food Chain; Genetic Fitness; Magnoliopsida / physiology; Plant Nectar / physiology; Pollination; Reproduction; Seeds / physiology; Sex Characteristics
TL;DR: The results suggest that the effects of multiple antagonists on estimates of plant fitness can be additive, and investigating which traits respond to damage can provide insight into how antagonists shape plant performance. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: August 28, 2020

2011 journal article

Selective seed abortion induced by nectar robbing in the selfing plant <i>Comastoma pulmonarium

New Phytologist, 192(1), 249–255.

By: C. Zhang*, R. Irwin*, Y. Wang*, Y. He*, Y. Yang* & Y. Duan*

TL;DR: It is suggested that nectar robbing can have both negative and positive effects on the quantity and quality, respectively, of progeny produced in selfing plants, and challenge the view that robbing has no effect on selfing species. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2010 journal article

Beyond biomass: measuring the effects of community‐level nitrogen enrichment on floral traits, pollinator visitation and plant reproduction

Journal of Ecology, 98(3), 705–717.

By: L. Burkle* & R. Irwin*

Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2010 journal article

Evolutionary Ecology: When Pollinators Are Also Herbivores

Current Biology, 20(3), R100–R101.

By: R. Irwin*

MeSH headings : Animals; Biological Evolution; Birds / physiology; Ecosystem; Moths / physiology; Plant Physiological Phenomena; Pollination
TL;DR: It has now been demonstrated how plants can resolve this conflict through a novel change in flowering traits. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: October 29, 2020

2010 journal article

Nectar Robbing: Ecological and Evolutionary Perspectives

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, 41(1), 271–292.

By: R. Irwin*, J. Bronstein*, J. Manson* & L. Richardson*

TL;DR: The evolutionary ecology of nectar robbing is reviewed from both the plant and animal perspective, and how plants may be able to deter robbers through morphological and chemical traits is detailed. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2010 journal article

Variation in the phenology and abundance of flowering by native and exotic plants in subalpine meadows

Biological Invasions, 12(7), 2363–2372.

By: B. Wilke* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: The effects of an invasive exotic flowering plant, Linaria vulgaris, on community and individual species flowering phenology and abundance in subalpine meadows in Colorado, USA and the relationship between L. vulgaris density and resident floral production are explored, suggesting that a dominant invasive plant can affect community andindividual-species flowering. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: October 29, 2020

2009 journal article

Ecogeographic genetic epidemiology

Genetic Epidemiology, 33(4), 281–289.

author keywords: geographic information systems; environmental health; population genetics; spatial genetics; medical geography; landscape genetics
MeSH headings : Ecosystem; Environment; Epidemiologic Methods; Genetics, Medical / statistics & numerical data; Genetics, Population / statistics & numerical data; Geography; Humans; Software
TL;DR: A new interdisciplinary paradigm is introduced, ecogeographic genetic epidemiology, which uses GIS and spatial statistical analyses to layer genetic subpopulation and environmental data with disease rates and thereby discern the complex gene‐environment interactions which result in spatial patterns of incidence. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
3. Good Health and Well-being (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: August 28, 2020

2009 journal article

Ecology and evolution of plant–pollinator interactions

Annals of Botany, 103(9), 1355–1363.

By: R. Mitchell*, R. Irwin*, R. Flanagan* & J. Karron*

TL;DR: This Viewpoint paper highlights the application of ecological and evolutionary approaches to two themes in pollination biology: (1) links between pollinator behaviour and plant mating systems, and (2) generalization and specialization inpollination systems. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2009 journal article

Effects of flowering plant density on pollinator visitation, pollen receipt, and seed production in <i>Delphinium barbeyi</i> (Ranunculaceae)

American Journal of Botany, 96(5), 912–919.

By: S. Elliott* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: The effects of conspecific flowering plant density on D. barbeyi pollination and seed production are minor, and experimental manipulation did not affect pollinator visitation rate, pollen receipt, or seed production. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2009 journal article

Nectar Sugar Limits Larval Growth of Solitary Bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

Environmental Entomology, 38(4), 1293–1300.

By: L. Burkle* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: This study suggests that, in addition to pollen, nectarsugar concentration can limit solitary bee larval growth and development, and nectar should be considered more explicitly as a currency governing foraging decisions related to producing optimally sized offspring. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2009 journal article

Realized tolerance to nectar robbing: compensation to floral enemies in Ipomopsis aggregata

Annals of Botany, 103(9), 1425–1433.

By: R. Irwin*

TL;DR: By linking concepts and techniques from studies of plant-pollinator and plant-herbivore interactions, this work provides insight into the role of floral traits in pollinator attraction as well as plant defence. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2009 journal article

The effects of nutrient addition on floral characters and pollination in two subalpine plants, Ipomopsis aggregata and Linum lewisii

Plant Ecology, 203(1), 83–98.

By: L. Burkle* & R. Irwin*

author keywords: Floral traits; Life-history; Nutrient limitation; Plant reproduction; Pollen limitation; Water addition
TL;DR: In both species, there were no effects of resource addition on male function, and the direct effects of fertilization on female function were relatively stronger than the indirect effects via changes in pollination. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: October 29, 2020

2009 journal article

The importance of interannual variation and bottom–up nitrogen enrichment for plant–pollinator networks

Oikos, 118(12), 1816–1829.

By: L. Burkle & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: The community structure of small-scale mutualistic networks may be relatively robust to short-term bottomup changes in the resource supply, but sensitive to variation in the opportunistic behavior and turnover of plant and pollinator species among years. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2008 journal article

Evaluation of the field impact of an adventitious herbivore on an invasive plant, yellow toadflax, in Colorado, USA

Plant Ecology, 199(1), 99–114.

By: J. Egan* & R. Irwin*

author keywords: biological Control; Brachypterolus pulicarius; herbivory; insect behavior; invasive; Linaria vulgaris
TL;DR: The effects of an accidentally introduced beetle Brachypterolus pulicarius on the growth and reproduction of its host, the invasive plant Linaria vulgaris, growing under field conditions across multiple years and sites in western Colorado, USA are studied. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: August 28, 2020

2008 journal article

Interactions between nectar robbers and seed predators mediated by a shared host plant, Ipomopsis aggregata

Oecologia, 155(1), 75–84.

By: A. Brody*, R. Irwin*, M. McCutcheon* & E. Parsons*

author keywords: scarlet gilia; multispecies interactions; nectar robbing; plant-animal interactions; pollination
MeSH headings : Animals; Bees / physiology; Diptera / physiology; Flowers / parasitology; Fruit / parasitology; Host-Parasite Interactions / physiology; Magnoliopsida / parasitology; Magnoliopsida / physiology; Predatory Behavior; Seeds / parasitology
TL;DR: The results suggest that seed predation is not independent of nectar robbing, and accounting for the interactions among species is crucial to predicting their ecological effects and plant evolutionary response. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: October 29, 2020

2008 journal article

MECHANISMS OF TOLERANCE TO FLORAL LARCENY IN TWO WILDFLOWER SPECIES

Ecology, 89(11), 3093–3104.

By: R. Irwin*, C. Galen*, J. Rabenold*, R. Kaczorowski* & M. McCutcheon*

TL;DR: It is suggested that tolerance to floral larceny involves "banking" extra flowers to replace lost reproduction rather than maintaining pollination of ones with larcenny, and that the efficacy of flower production as a tolerance mechanism varies inversely to larcenist intensity. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2008 journal article

NECTAR SECONDARY COMPOUNDS AFFECT SELF-POLLEN TRANSFER: IMPLICATIONS FOR FEMALE AND MALE REPRODUCTION

Ecology, 89(8), 2207–2217.

By: R. Irwin* & L. Adler*

TL;DR: The hypothesis that nectar with secondary compounds may benefit plants by encouraging pollinators to leave plants after visiting only a few flowers, thus reducing self-pollen transfer is tested and an exponential model of pollen carryover suggests that high nectar alkaloids could benefit plants via increased pollen export (an estimate of male function), but only when pollinators were efficient and abundant and plants had large floral displays. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2008 journal article

Pre-meeting Conference; The Ecology and Evolution of Plant–Pollinator Interactions

Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America, 89(4), 481–484.

By: R. Irwin*, R. Mitchell* & J. Karron*

Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2008 journal article

The nectar alkaloid, gelsemine, does not affect offspring performance of a native solitary bee, <i>Osmia lignaria</i> (Megachilidae)

Ecological Entomology, 33(2), 298–304.

By: S. Elliott*, R. Irwin*, L. Adler* & N. Williams*

TL;DR: The ecology and evolution of foliar‐feeding insects are thought to be closely tied to plant secondary compounds, which are also abundant in floral nectar, and their role in mediating pollinator preference and performance remains relatively unexplored. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2007 book review

Plant-Pollinator Interactions: From Specialization to Generalization N. M. Waser, J. Ollerton . 2006. Plant-Pollinator Interactions: From Specialization to Generalization. University of Chicago Press.<i>xii</i>+. 445 15 × 23 cm, softcover, US$45.00. ISBN: 0-226-87400-1.

[Review of Plant-Pollinator Interactions: From Specialization to Generalization, by N. M. Waser & J. Ollerton]. Ecoscience, 14(1), 135–136.

By: R. Irwin*

UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
2. Zero Hunger (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 24, 2024

2007 journal article

Predicting the effects of nectar robbing on plant reproduction: implications of pollen limitation and plant mating system

American Journal of Botany, 94(12), 1935–1943.

By: L. Burkle*, R. Irwin* & D. Newman*

TL;DR: The results suggest that pollination biology and plant mating system must be considered to understand and predict the ecological outcome of both mutualistic and antagonistic plant-animal interactions. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2006 journal article

Correlations among traits associated with herbivore resistance and pollination: implications for pollination and nectar robbing in a distylous plant

American Journal of Botany, 93(1), 64–72.

By: R. Irwin* & L. Adler*

TL;DR: Trait expression influenced pollination more so than robbing and pollen receipt was lower in plants that expressed higher levels of leaf gelsemine in two sites, implying that traits associated with pollination and herbivore resistance may not be independent. (via Semantic Scholar)
UN Sustainable Development Goal Categories
15. Life on Land (OpenAlex)
Source: Crossref
Added: February 18, 2024

2006 journal article

Florivory: the intersection of pollination and herbivory

Ecology Letters, 9(12), 1351–1365.

By: A. McCall* & R. Irwin*

TL;DR: The approaches to studying florivory that are outlined may yield novel insights into floral and defence traits not illuminated by studies of pollination or herbivory alone. (via Semantic Scholar)
Source: Crossref